June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID
Published in Children's Justice Act
June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID
Published in Children's Justice Act

How victims of child maltreatment fare in school

Thomas B. Fordham Institute - April 18, 2018

Although there is much research about "achievement gaps" between wealthy and poor students and the effects of "toxic stress" on academic outcomes, a recent study sought to examine the depth at which such issues as homelessness, domestic violence, neglect, and abuse can affect students in school, as well as the prevalence of the problem across schools and demographic groups.

Report: https://www.brookings.edu/research/how-life-outside-of-a-school-affects-student-performance-in-school/

https://edexcellence.net/articles/how-victims-of-child-maltreatment-fare-in-school

Published in Children's Justice Act

Sociopathic parents exist and can cause great harm to their children through both emotional and physical abuse, even to the point of producing sociopathic children. In addition, co-parenting with a sociopath can be very troubling.

sociopath is a man or a woman who cares only about him/herself (What Is A Sociopathic Person Like?). All the world is his stage, and all the people merely his puppets on a string. He is a social predator in all aspects of his life, including parenthood; he's a sociopathic parent.

Read the full article, click here: https://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/sociopath/sociopathic-parents-and-their-effects-on-children/ 

New data: child abuse deaths rise, notably in Texas, Indiana

Associated Press - February 02, 2018

According to a report released this week by the Department of Health and Human Services, there were 1,700 fatalities resulting from child maltreatment reported in fiscal year 2016, compared to 1,589 the previous year - a 7 percent increase. The figures encompass data from every state but Maine, as well as from the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Report: Child Maltreatment 2016: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/child-maltreatment-2016

Also: Federal Report: Child Maltreatment Numbers Down, Child Deaths Up: https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-welfare-2/federal-report-child-maltreatment-numbers-down-child-deaths-up

Also: United States: Report Reveals Sharp Increase in Child Abuse Deaths: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/United-States-Report-Reveals-Sharp-Increase-in-Child-Abuse-Deaths-20180203-0008.html

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/new-data-child-abuse-deaths-rise-notably-in-texas-indiana/article_4eb78a2d-c7d7-5bf7-914c-7720064c3461.html

Published in Data & Technology

Practice and Policy Considerations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical, and Service Providers

This guidance publication is intended to support the efforts of states, tribes, and local communities in addressing the needs of pregnant women with opioid use disorders and their infants and families.1 National data show that from 2000 to 2009 the use of opioids during pregnancy increased from 1.19 to 5.63 per 1,000 hospital births (Patrick, Schumacher, Benneyworth, Krans, McAllister, & Davis, 2012). Because of the high rate of opioid use and misuse among all women, including pregnant women, medical, social service, and judicial agencies are having to confront this concern more often and, in some communities, at alarming rates.

Read the full report: Link to Report

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Administration for Children and Families Administration on Children, Youth and Families Children’s Bureau

Child maltreatment has significant negative effects on a child’s cognitive development, social and emotional competence, psychological and behavioral health, and physical health. Maltreated children fare worse than their peers on many important outcomes within these domains. The effects can persist and have long-term consequences into adulthood, including reduced labor market productivity, increased involvement with the criminal justice system, and increased likelihood of homelessness. Given the far-ranging consequences of child maltreatment, a great deal of attention has been focused on identifying policies and programs that address this issue.

These programs and policies fall into two broad categories: those designed to prevent child maltreatment from occurring and those designed to mitigate the effects once maltreatment has occurred. The purpose of this project is to provide objective analyses that can inform the debate about how best to allocate funds to improve child welfare outcomes. The results of this effort will be of interest to policymakers, practitioners, researchers, community leaders, and others interested in better understanding the impact of investing or reallocating resources at different points within the child welfare system. The work described here can help identify strategies that prevent deeper involvement in the child welfare system, assess the costs and benefits of these different strategies, and ultimately improve outcomes for children.

This research was funded by Pritzker Foster Care Initiative and conducted jointly under the auspices of four units at the RAND Corporation: Health; Labor and Population; Education; and Justice, Infrastructure, and Energy. 

Improving Child Welfare Outcomes: Balancing Investments in Prevention and Treatment.
Rand Research Report; RR1775
Ringel, Jeanne S. Schultz, Dana. Mendelsohn, Joshua. Brooks-Holiday, Stephanie. Edochie, Ifeanyi. Davis, Lauren.
Rand Corporation.
2017
https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR1775.html

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR1700/RR1775/RAND_RR1775.pdf

Published in Children's Justice Act

The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect.
Kahn, Nicholas. Gupta-Kagan, Josh. Hansen, Mary.
2017
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies
14(2)p. 333-369
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2818533

 

The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect by Nicholas Kahn, Josh Gupta-Kagan, Mary Eschelbach Hansen :: SSRN

Abstract

We measure the extent to which requiring a high standard of proof for substantiation of child abuse or neglect by child protection agencies actually influences the disposition of a report of abuse or neglect. Using data on nearly 8 million reports from fiscal 2000-2012, we show that a high standard is associated with lower rates of substantiation and that an increase in the standard decreases the probability of substantiation by up to 14 percent. After a change to a high standard, children may be less likely to be placed in foster care, and children and families are more likely to receive other types of services. Increases in the standard seem to be driven by perceptions of the costs of type 1 error – that is, substantiating a report when no abuse occurred. Indeed, states’ decisions to increase the standard are strongly correlated with fatalities in foster care and the size of the foster care system, suggesting that public concern about type 1 error leading to overly-invasive child protection agency action can spur a shift in the standard of proof.

 

 
This year’s Resource Guide continues to reflect the theme of the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect’s 20th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, "Building Community, Building Hope," which was held in Washington, DC, in August 2016. Going forward, the Resource Guide will be produced biannually to align with OCAN’s biannual national conference.
 
This guide is a joint product of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau, its Child Welfare Information Gateway, and the FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. This annual Resource Guide is one of the Children’s Bureau’s most anticipated publications, offering trusted information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. Its contents are informed by input from some of our National Child Abuse Prevention Partners, as well as our colleagues on the Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse and Neglect. Child abuse and neglect is a national issue that affects us all. The consequences of child abuse and neglect ripple across the lifespan, negatively impacting a child’s chances to succeed in school, work, and relationships. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families supports the promotion of meaningful and measurable results in social and emotional well-being, and we continue to support evidence-based and trauma-informed services and practices to achieve positive outcomes for the children, families, and communities we serve.
 
The 2016/2017 Resource Guide plays an important role in these efforts—offering support to service providers as they work with parents, caregivers, and children to prevent child maltreatment and promote social and emotional well-being. To do so, the Resource Guide focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Information about protective factors is augmented with tools and strategies that help providers integrate the factors into community programs and systems. Agencies, policymakers, advocates, service providers, and parents alike will find resources in this guide to help them promote these important elements within their families and communities. 
 
Effective early prevention efforts are less costly to our nation and to individuals than trying to fix the adverse effects of child maltreatment. We hope this Resource Guide is helpful to you in your efforts to prevent child abuse and promote well-being. We thank you for participating in this important effort and for the work you do each day to build promising futures for our nation’s children and families.
 
Elaine Voces Stedt, M.S.W.
Director
Office on Child Abuse and Neglect
Children’s Bureau
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
Administration for Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
 
 
 
Tuesday, 24 January 2017 10:33

Child Maltreatment 2015

Based on State-level data from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS), Child Maltreatment 2015 presents an aggregate view of child abuse and neglect in the United States. This resource includes information on the reports made to child protective services (CPS), the children involved in CPS cases, child fatalities, perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, and available services.

 Highlights from Child Maltreatment 2015 include the following:

  • Neglect was the most common type of child maltreatment in 2015, which 75.3 percent of victims experienced.
  • For States able to report on the alcohol abuse caregiver risk factor, 10.3 percent of victims and 5.5 percent of nonvictims were reported with this caregiver risk factor. For reporting States, 25.4 percent of victims and 8.1 percent of nonvictims were reported with the drug abuse caregiver risk factor.
  • For 2015, an estimated 1,670 children died of abuse and neglect at a rate of 2.25 deaths per 100,000.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families (ACF) released this report as the 26th in a series designed to collect and analyze State child abuse and neglect statistics. The Child Maltreatment series is used to assess the efficacy of Federal programs and inform researches, practitioners, and advocates around the world.

The full Child Maltreatment 2015 report is available to view and download on the Children's Bureau website, along with access to archived Child Maltreatment reports 1995–2014.

 Published January 2017.

 

Published in Data & Technology
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