New Study Ranks States on How Well They Help Homeless Students. Where Does Your State Rank?

74 - June 25, 2017

Homeless students have long been considered an invisible population in American education policy discussions, but the new federal education law puts a renewed emphasis on identifying and serving them. In recent years, some states have focused on success for displaced youth. However, huge disparities still exist across the country, according to a new report by the Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness.

Also: Out of the Shadows: A State-by-State Ranking of Accountability for Homeless Students: http://www.icphusa.org/national/shadows-state-state-ranking-accountability-homeless-students/

https://www.the74million.org/article/new-study-ranks-states-on-how-well-they-help-homeless-students-where-does-your-state-rank

Published in Children's Justice Act

Group Decisions Benefit Kids With Disabilities

Medpage Today - May 29, 2017

Shared decision-making (SDM) involving patients and physicians to develop treatment plans should always be used for children with disabilities, stated a clinical report from the Academy of Pediatrics. The report specifically suggested the practice for children with acquired and developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, neurodevelopmental disabilities, and those in the state foster care system with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

Report: Shared Decision-Making and Children With Disabilities: Pathways to Consensus: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2017/05/25/peds.2017-0956

http://www.medpagetoday.com/pediatrics/parenting/65628

Tuesday, 20 October 2015 00:00

KIDS COUNT Data Book 2015

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual publication that assesses child well-being nationally and across the 50 states, as well as in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Using an index of 16 indicators, the report ranks states on overall child well-being and in economic well-being, education, health and family and community.

The 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book focuses on America’s children in the midst of the country's economic recovery. While data show improvements in child health and education, more families are struggling to make ends meet, and a growing number of kids live in high-poverty neighborhoods. In addition to ranking states in several areas of child well-being, the report also examines the influence of parents’ education, health and other life circumstances on their children.

July 21, 2015

Published in Data & Technology

This report begins with a review of federal appropriations activity in FY2015 as it relates to child welfare programs, including the effect of the automatic spending cuts, known as sequestration. The rest of the report provides a short description of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2012-FY2015) funding levels. Information is provided that indicates final FY2015 child welfare funding ($7.971 billion) was appropriated as part of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 (P.L. 113-235). It is explained that beginning with FY2013, some discretionary and mandatory funding amounts appropriated for child welfare programs have been reduced under the sequestration measures provided for in the Budget Control Act (P.L. 112-25), and that the effect of these sequestration measures varies by fiscal year and type for funding authority. It is determined that for FY2015, funding provided on a discretionary basis in P.L. 113-235 is within the established spending caps and is not expected to be affected by sequestration. The report goes on to explain that the largest amount of federal funding provided to child welfare programs is through mandatory funding authorized under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act and is statutorily exempted from sequestration; however, a few child welfare programs that receive mandatory funding may be subject to sequestration, including funding provided for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program. For nonexempt mandatory child welfare funding, it is reported the final FY2015 funding level must be reduced from the otherwise appropriated levels by 7.3%. 16 tables and 100 references.

Access the full report here.

Raising Children With Special Health Care Needs and the Impact on Family Health. 
Health impacts all aspects of life. When one member of the family has health needs, such as those determined.Health impacts all aspects of life. When one member of the family has health needs, such as those experienced by children with special health care needs (CSHCN), the entire family is impacted. In this paper, families describe some of the daily struggles and obstacles that they have learned to adjust to and overcome. The following stories are from families in Kansas who hope to shed light on the many impacts raising CSHCN has on the family, including parental or caregiver physical and emotional health, impact on the siblings' life, and the importance of building a support network. 

Click here to read more.

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2015 is a compendium of indicators depicting the condition of our Nation’s young people. The report, the 17th in an ongoing series, presents 41 key indicators on important aspects of children’s lives. These indicators are drawn from our most reliable Federal statistics, are easily understood by broad audiences, are objectively based on substantial research, are balanced so that no single area of children’s lives dominates the report, are measured often to show trends over time, and are representative of large segments of the population rather than one particular group. http://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2015/ac_15.pdf

Published in Home Page

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