A newly revised field manual, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, is now available. The manual reflects recent practice innovations, the latest research and data, and a greater emphasis on family preservation and in-home services.

The comprehensive user manual informs child protective services (CPS) workers, supervisors, and related professionals on multiple issues related to the co-occurrence of child maltreatment and domestic violence. The newly revised edition reflects the Children's Bureau commitment to a collaborative and community-based approach to child protection and offers guidance on:

  • Ensuring the safety of children in incidents of domestic violence
  • Ensuring domestic violence survivor safety
  • Perpetrator accountability
  • Agency response

The updated manual also addresses the following practice issues:

  • Guidelines for assessing families experiencing domestic violence
  • Perpetrators of domestic violence
  • Adult survivors and child witnesses
  • Complexity of children's issues and trauma-focused approach
  • Safety and wellness for CPS workers
  • Building collaborative responses for families experiencing domestic violence

The revised manual is part of the Children's Bureau Child Abuse and Neglect User Manual Series—last updated in 2003—and serves as a companion piece to Child Protective Services: A Guide for Caseworkers, a second revised manual in the series. The updated manuals from the U.S. Department of Health and Services' Children's Bureau Office on Child Abuse and Neglect are available at https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals.

For a series of tip sheets on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment—including general practice recommendations, suggestions for engaging families, and guidance on documentation, assessment, decision-making, and planning—see the Child Welfare Capacity Building Center for States' Domestic Violence and the Child Welfare Professional Series at https://capacity.childwelfare.gov/states/focus-areas/child-protection/domestic-violence.

Published in Children's Justice Act
June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID
Published in Children's Justice Act
June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID
Published in Children's Justice Act

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