I Need You, You Need Me: The Young, the Old, and What We Can Achieve Together, the new report from Generations United and The Eisner Foundation, highlights national examples of pioneers reuniting the generations and making their communities better places to live.

It includes a new public opinion survey on how Americans of all ages feel about the young and the old uniting. Taking inspiration from the survey findings and featured organizations, the report highlights inventive, intergenerational solutions and actionable ways to harness the benefits of connecting generations. They include:

  • Lobby your local government to make age integration a core value
  • Call on organizations that serve the young to collaborate with those that serve the old
  • Challenge your local board of education to integrate elders into every school
  • Urge local foundation to support intergenerational programs

Generations United and The Eisner Foundation © 2017

Download the Executive Summary
Download the Background Paper
Download the Infographic
Watch the Press Club Event Recording
Catch the Highlights in our Storify

Published in Children's Justice Act

This report begins with an overview of the FY2017 federal child welfare funding. It then includes a discussion of how annual funding levels are determined for child welfare programs, and briefly discusses the effect of sequestration on that child welfare funding. The remainder, and largest part, of the report provides descriptions of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2013-FY2017) funding levels. The review indicates that for FY2017, an estimated $8.9 billion in federal support is available for child welfare purposes. The largest share of this federal child welfare funding is provided for support of children in foster care, and for ongoing assistance to children who leave foster care for new permanent families. The federal cost was estimated at $7.5 billion in FY2016 and, as of the July 2017 mid-session budget review, was expected to be $7.8 billion in FY2017. Federal funding for all other child welfare activities remained at $1.1 billion in FY2017, which was the same level provided in FY2016. Nearly all federal child welfare dollars (97%) were provided to State, tribal, or territorial child welfare agencies (via formula grants or as federal reimbursement for a part of all eligible program costs). The remaining federal child welfare dollars (3%) are provided to a variety of eligible public or private entities, primarily on a competitive basis. This money supports research, evaluation, technical assistance, and demonstration projects to expand knowledge of, and improve, child welfare practice and policy. Federally supported programs are described that are authorized under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the Victims of Child Abuse Act, and other programs. 21 tables and 136 references. 

Link to report

Title: Child Welfare: An Overview of Federal Programs and Their Current Funding. August 2017. 
Published: 2017 
Available from: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service 
http://loc.gov/crsinfo/ 
101 Independence Avenue, SE 
Washington, DC 20540-7500

Published in Children's Justice Act

Low-income families face significant challenges navigating both low-wage employment or education and training programs and also finding good-quality child care. Programs that intentionally combine services for parents and children can help families move toward economic security and create conditions that promote child and family well-being. Although these programs in general are not new (see Background), policymakers and program leaders are now experimenting with innovative approaches to combining services. Yet, most currently operating programs, sometimes called “two-generation” or “dual generation” programs, have not yet been rigorously evaluated (Chase-Lansdale and Brooks-Gunn 2014). We conducted a targeted review of publicly available documents and literature. This scan aimed to identify common features of programs operating as of early 2016 that offer integrated services to support both family economic security and child development and well-being (see About This Project). This brief presents the results of the scan related to six key questions:

1. How did programs develop?

2. How mature are these programs?

3. Whom do these programs serve?

4. What services do programs provide to adults and children?

5. How do programs engage both parents and children?

6. How do programs fund their services for parents and children?

 

Read the full report, click here.

Features of Programs Designed to Help Families Achieve Economic Security and Promote Child Well-being.
OPRE Report #2017-49
Sama-Miller, Emily. Baumgartner, Scott.
OPRE.
2017