Each year, the U.S. Department of Justice, through OJJDP, recognizes individuals, organizations, and law enforcement agencies that have made a difference in recovering abducted children and protecting children from exploitation. The Department recognizes the awardees each May at the annual National Missing Children's Day ceremony in Washington, DC. Access the nomination forms for the 2018 National Missing Children's Day awards online:

The deadline for nominations is January 24, 2018.

Published in Home Page

Fact Sheet: Seven components of a culturally responsive approach to serving diverse populations

 

The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families released a fact sheet that outlines a comprehensive approach for practitioners looking to create strong, culturally responsive programs for community-based organizations.

As the U.S. population grows increasingly diverse, a culturally responsive approach to developing programs that serve communities is essential. This resource guide helps to ensure that practitioners don't need to start from scratch when working to design programs that serve all members of their communities. Click for more information.

Published in Children's Justice Act
 
This year’s Resource Guide continues to reflect the theme of the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect’s 20th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, "Building Community, Building Hope," which was held in Washington, DC, in August 2016. Going forward, the Resource Guide will be produced biannually to align with OCAN’s biannual national conference.
 
This guide is a joint product of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau, its Child Welfare Information Gateway, and the FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. This annual Resource Guide is one of the Children’s Bureau’s most anticipated publications, offering trusted information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. Its contents are informed by input from some of our National Child Abuse Prevention Partners, as well as our colleagues on the Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse and Neglect. Child abuse and neglect is a national issue that affects us all. The consequences of child abuse and neglect ripple across the lifespan, negatively impacting a child’s chances to succeed in school, work, and relationships. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families supports the promotion of meaningful and measurable results in social and emotional well-being, and we continue to support evidence-based and trauma-informed services and practices to achieve positive outcomes for the children, families, and communities we serve.
 
The 2016/2017 Resource Guide plays an important role in these efforts—offering support to service providers as they work with parents, caregivers, and children to prevent child maltreatment and promote social and emotional well-being. To do so, the Resource Guide focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Information about protective factors is augmented with tools and strategies that help providers integrate the factors into community programs and systems. Agencies, policymakers, advocates, service providers, and parents alike will find resources in this guide to help them promote these important elements within their families and communities. 
 
Effective early prevention efforts are less costly to our nation and to individuals than trying to fix the adverse effects of child maltreatment. We hope this Resource Guide is helpful to you in your efforts to prevent child abuse and promote well-being. We thank you for participating in this important effort and for the work you do each day to build promising futures for our nation’s children and families.
 
Elaine Voces Stedt, M.S.W.
Director
Office on Child Abuse and Neglect
Children’s Bureau
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
Administration for Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
 
 
 

An important new study was released October 17, 2016. It will soon be published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's the first national large scale study to compare mental health and physical health of foster kids with the general population, including children in economically disadvantaged families. Not surprisingly, it found kids in foster care are: 

  • Seven times as likely to experience depression
  • Six times as likely to exhibit behavioral problems
  • Five times as likely to feel anxiety
  • Three times as likely to have attention deficit disorder, hearing impairments and vision issues
  • Twice as likely to suffer from learning disabilities, developmental delays, asthma, obesity and speech problems

The study is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118

A PDF copy of the report can be accessed here: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118.full.pdf

This statement from one of the authors may be particularly of interest:
"This work makes an important contribution to the research community by showing for the first time that foster care children are in considerably worse health than other children. Our findings also present serious implications for pediatricians by suggesting that foster care placement is a risk factor for health problems in childhood."

Information shared by the ABA Center for Children and the Law

Wednesday, 12 October 2016 11:28

Louisiana Regional Resource Guide

The Louisiana Regional Resource Guide has been recently updated and released. This guide is prepared by HP Serve under a human trafficking grant from the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Updated October 2016.

This is the second of a series of articles that examines the role that advocates for parents and families can play in furthering the well-being and safety of children. This article highlights emerging parent representation models that expedite the safe reunification of children already in foster care. Written by Vivek S. Sankaran, Patricia L. Rideout and Martha L. Raimon.

"Effective child welfare leaders are not interested in adversarial relationships with parents or their attorneys. They are invested in accomplishing their mission: making sure children, youth and families get what they need so that every child can grow up in a
safe and stable family."    - Patricia L. Rideout, Former Administrator, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Division of Children and Family Services

Click to access the full article.

 

Published in Parents' Attorneys

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