OJJDP has released the spring 2018 issue of The AMBER Advocate newsletter. This issue features articles on:

• AMBER Alert Training and Technical Assistance Program Administrator Jim Walters' vision for the future of child protection.
• Faces of the AMBER Alert Network.
• The role an Idaho AMBER Alert played in the recovery of two sisters.
• AMBER Alert in Indian Country.
• AMBER Alert in international news.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children coordinate the AMBER Alert program nationally. As of March 2018, a total of 924 children had been successfully recovered through the AMBER Alert system.

Resources:

Find AMBER Alert on Facebook.

OJJDP has released the spring 2018 issue of The AMBER Advocate newsletter. This issue features articles on:

• AMBER Alert Training and Technical Assistance Program Administrator Jim Walters' vision for the future of child protection.
• Faces of the AMBER Alert Network.
• The role an Idaho AMBER Alert played in the recovery of two sisters.
• AMBER Alert in Indian Country.
• AMBER Alert in international news.

The U.S. Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children coordinate the AMBER Alert program nationally. As of March 2018, a total of 924 children had been successfully recovered through the AMBER Alert system.

Resources:

Find AMBER Alert on Facebook.

The Capacity Building Center for Courts has created a Domestic Child Sex Trafficking Judicial Desk Reference Guide.  This resource provides links and examples of how Court Improvement Programs (CIP) can implement P.L. 113-183.  Specifically, it addresses:

 

How to form a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to measure your success as a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to identify victims and potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to identify and provide services for victims/potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to be (Trafficking) Trauma-Informed and how to conduct a Trauma audit of your court

 

The PDF version is attached here and the web link to the resource is: file:///C:/Users/lesli/Downloads/113-183BenchReference-_ColorFixed-md4_jd4_cm-md-QF.PDF

 

Take Care,

 

Leslie Briner, MSW

P.L. 113-183 Sex Trafficking Constituency Group Lead

CAPACITY BUILDING CENTER FOR STATES

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Sociopathic parents exist and can cause great harm to their children through both emotional and physical abuse, even to the point of producing sociopathic children. In addition, co-parenting with a sociopath can be very troubling.

sociopath is a man or a woman who cares only about him/herself (What Is A Sociopathic Person Like?). All the world is his stage, and all the people merely his puppets on a string. He is a social predator in all aspects of his life, including parenthood; he's a sociopathic parent.

Read the full article, click here: https://www.healthyplace.com/personality-disorders/sociopath/sociopathic-parents-and-their-effects-on-children/ 

Wednesday, 07 March 2018 12:56

Natural Disaster Resource Guide

Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) is committed to assisting those who have been deeply affected by the most recent hurricanes in the ways that we can. To do so, we have created this webpage which includes our Natural Disaster Resource Guide with information relevant for individuals, families, and agencies providing services to children and families impacted by the hurricanes.  We have been able to gather information from our public and private member agencies that were significantly impacted by previous natural disasters and their lessons learned from those experiences.

Special attention has been given to the importance of recognizing that agency staff are often also victims of the disaster. We have included ways in which agencies can address the needs of their staff and their own families while they are attending to the needs of the children and families they serve.

CWLA understands that those currently impacted have needs that may be short-term as well as long-term, and we will be adding more resources to this guide and to this webpage as they become available.

If you have any resources that you think would be helpful, please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will include them as appropriate.

LINK TO RESOURCE GUIDE

Published in Children's Justice Act

Fact Sheet: Seven components of a culturally responsive approach to serving diverse populations

 

The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families released a fact sheet that outlines a comprehensive approach for practitioners looking to create strong, culturally responsive programs for community-based organizations.

As the U.S. population grows increasingly diverse, a culturally responsive approach to developing programs that serve communities is essential. This resource guide helps to ensure that practitioners don't need to start from scratch when working to design programs that serve all members of their communities. Click for more information.

Published in Children's Justice Act
 
This year’s Resource Guide continues to reflect the theme of the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect’s 20th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, "Building Community, Building Hope," which was held in Washington, DC, in August 2016. Going forward, the Resource Guide will be produced biannually to align with OCAN’s biannual national conference.
 
This guide is a joint product of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau, its Child Welfare Information Gateway, and the FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. This annual Resource Guide is one of the Children’s Bureau’s most anticipated publications, offering trusted information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. Its contents are informed by input from some of our National Child Abuse Prevention Partners, as well as our colleagues on the Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse and Neglect. Child abuse and neglect is a national issue that affects us all. The consequences of child abuse and neglect ripple across the lifespan, negatively impacting a child’s chances to succeed in school, work, and relationships. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families supports the promotion of meaningful and measurable results in social and emotional well-being, and we continue to support evidence-based and trauma-informed services and practices to achieve positive outcomes for the children, families, and communities we serve.
 
The 2016/2017 Resource Guide plays an important role in these efforts—offering support to service providers as they work with parents, caregivers, and children to prevent child maltreatment and promote social and emotional well-being. To do so, the Resource Guide focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Information about protective factors is augmented with tools and strategies that help providers integrate the factors into community programs and systems. Agencies, policymakers, advocates, service providers, and parents alike will find resources in this guide to help them promote these important elements within their families and communities. 
 
Effective early prevention efforts are less costly to our nation and to individuals than trying to fix the adverse effects of child maltreatment. We hope this Resource Guide is helpful to you in your efforts to prevent child abuse and promote well-being. We thank you for participating in this important effort and for the work you do each day to build promising futures for our nation’s children and families.
 
Elaine Voces Stedt, M.S.W.
Director
Office on Child Abuse and Neglect
Children’s Bureau
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
Administration for Children and Families,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
 
 
 

An important new study was released October 17, 2016. It will soon be published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's the first national large scale study to compare mental health and physical health of foster kids with the general population, including children in economically disadvantaged families. Not surprisingly, it found kids in foster care are: 

  • Seven times as likely to experience depression
  • Six times as likely to exhibit behavioral problems
  • Five times as likely to feel anxiety
  • Three times as likely to have attention deficit disorder, hearing impairments and vision issues
  • Twice as likely to suffer from learning disabilities, developmental delays, asthma, obesity and speech problems

The study is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118

A PDF copy of the report can be accessed here: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118.full.pdf

This statement from one of the authors may be particularly of interest:
"This work makes an important contribution to the research community by showing for the first time that foster care children are in considerably worse health than other children. Our findings also present serious implications for pediatricians by suggesting that foster care placement is a risk factor for health problems in childhood."

Information shared by the ABA Center for Children and the Law

Wednesday, 12 October 2016 11:28

Louisiana Regional Resource Guide

The Louisiana Regional Resource Guide has been recently updated and released. This guide is prepared by HP Serve under a human trafficking grant from the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Updated October 2016.

This is the second of a series of articles that examines the role that advocates for parents and families can play in furthering the well-being and safety of children. This article highlights emerging parent representation models that expedite the safe reunification of children already in foster care. Written by Vivek S. Sankaran, Patricia L. Rideout and Martha L. Raimon.

"Effective child welfare leaders are not interested in adversarial relationships with parents or their attorneys. They are invested in accomplishing their mission: making sure children, youth and families get what they need so that every child can grow up in a
safe and stable family."    - Patricia L. Rideout, Former Administrator, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Division of Children and Family Services

Click to access the full article.

 

Published in Parents' Attorneys

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