Fact Sheet: Seven components of a culturally responsive approach to serving diverse populations

 

The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families released a fact sheet that outlines a comprehensive approach for practitioners looking to create strong, culturally responsive programs for community-based organizations.

As the U.S. population grows increasingly diverse, a culturally responsive approach to developing programs that serve communities is essential. This resource guide helps to ensure that practitioners don't need to start from scratch when working to design programs that serve all members of their communities. Click for more information.

Published in Children's Justice Act

The US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families and Office for Civil Rights have compiled documents that provide guidance to ensure that child welfare agencies and state court systems are aware of their responsibilities to protect the civil rights of children and families in the child welfare system. The attached documents will address policy for Title VI, Disabilities, and Disproportionality issues.

Thursday, 17 August 2017 15:26

Dads Rock! Nurturing Father Engagement

Information Gateway recently added a new video to the Building Community, Building Hope collection called "Dad's Rock! Nurturing Father Engagement." "Dad's Rock!" follows fathers on the journey to deepen their bonds with their children and the professionals working to improve father engagement. Research indicates children have increased positive outcomes when dads are involved, and yet all too often, agencies struggle to attract fathers to their services, and fathers face unconscious bias that keeps them at arms' length. Highlighting the work of the Children's Trust of Massachusetts Fatherhood Initiative, this film takes viewers into home visits with dads, father support groups, and professional men's family service providers' groups. The 11-minute video provides insights into working differently with dads and addressing existing biases. Watch this and other videos in the Building Community, Building Hope collection at https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/communities/bcbh/.

Published in Families

The growing awareness of human trafficking in the United States and abroad requires government and human services agencies to reevaluate old policies and develop new ones for identifying and serving victims. Due to their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability, children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers who are actively seeking children1 to exploit. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare agencies be at the forefront of the response to and prevention of human trafficking. Additionally, recent Federal legislation established new requirements for child welfare agencies related to identifying and serving minor victims of human trafficking.

1 For the purposes of this report, the term “children” includes youth. The term “youth” is used when source materials specifically reference that population.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE (in attached file)

Child welfare caseworkers can be an invaluable resource in helping communities respond to the human trafficking of children. Children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers because of their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare caseworkers be at the forefront of efforts to identify, respond to, and prevent human trafficking. This bulletin explores how caseworkers can identify and support children who have been victimized as well as children that are at greater risk for future victimization. It provides background information about the issue, strategies caseworkers can use to identify and support victims and potential victims, and tools and resources that can assist caseworkers.

READ THE FULL DOCUMENT

Missing Children, State Care, and Child Sex Trafficking: Engaging the Judiciary in Building a Collaborative Response

This technical assistance brief is a publication of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®. Special thanks to Melissa Snow, M.A., Child Sex Trafficking Program Specialist, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, and Mimari Hall, M.A., for developing this technical assistance brief. Additional thanks to Maureen Sheeran, Chief Program Officer, and Sarah Smith, J.D., Senior Staff Attorney of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges for their thorough review as well as Staca Shehan, Director, Case Analysis Division, and Yiota Souras, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Reproduction of this publication for noncommercial education and information purposes is encouraged. Reproduction of any part of this publication must include the copyright notice and attribution:
Missing Children, State Care, and Child Sex Trafficking: Engaging the Judiciary in Building a Collaborative Response. Technical assistance brief. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Alexandria, Virginia, and National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Reno, Nevada, 2015. Copyright © 2015 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. All rights reserved.

Published in Judges

Determining if a Child is Safe

The basic and most important determination judges make in child in need of care cases is whether a child(ren) is safe. Critical safety decisions are made when removing a child and determining whether a child should return home. However, without a comprehensive decision-making structure and thorough inquiry, decisions can lead to over and under removal, leaving children unsafe or returning them home too quickly. 

The Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) has implemented a research-based, structured safety assessment process designed to avoid these problems. It is the responsibility of all individuals involved in a case to understand the goal of child safety, the terminology used when discussing safety, and the type of information needed to make good decisions about child safety.

This bulletin was developed in 2016 by the Pelican Center for Children and Families with assistance from ABA Center for Children and the Law and the Pelican Center/Louisiana Child Welfare Training Academy Training and Education Committee members. Please download and share!

 

Published in Law and Best Practices
Tuesday, 13 June 2017 10:28

2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book

2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book (Press release)

Annie E. Casey Foundation - June 13, 2017

The Annie E. Casey Foundation urged policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation's economy as adults. The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued its drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist.

2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book: http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-2017kidscountdatabook.pdf

http://www.aecf.org/resources/2017-kids-count-data-book/

Published in Data & Technology
Friday, 17 February 2017 16:42

The Crisis of Connection for Adolescent Boys

U.S. Office of Adolescent Health presents: TAG Talks

Video: "The Crisis of Connection for Adolescent Boys with Niobe Way

Niobe Way

NYU Professor Niobe Way explains how boys' intimate friendships in early and middle adolescence support their mental health. By late adolescence, many boys speak of losing these close male friendships and reveal feelings of loneliness and isolation. The webcast illuminates the dangers of assuming that boys don’t want or need close male friendships and the importance of fostering positive friendships that can help adolescent boys thrive. 

Published in Children's Justice Act

Most children involved in child welfare systems, and the overwhelming majority of children placed in out-of-home care, have a parent with an alcohol or other substance use disorder. Here is a 2-page information flyer from Children & Family Futures. 

Published in Children's Justice Act
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