This guidebook was created through a partnership with Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services and Louisiana Department of Health. The State of Louisiana has participated in several policy academies, consortia and innovative projects to help guide the integration of behavioral health services into physical health in order to enhance services and improve patient care. Louisiana's participation in the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Accelerator Program for Substance Use Disorders (IAP/SUD) is just one example of a collaborative effort for stakeholders to come together to address substance use disorders (SUD) and related conditions.

This Toolkit has been approved the the Louisiana Perinatal Commission, which will serve as a partner for statewide dissemination and integration into future projects and initiatives. 

This guide is intended for use in medical settings, but may have a broader use as a reference guide.

Link to Toolkit: http://ldh.la.gov/assets/docs/BehavioralHealth/NASBooklet.pdf 

Published in Children's Justice Act

 The 20th in a series, this report presents a set of 41 key indicators that measure important aspects of children's lives. It draws on various overarching frameworks to identify seven major domains that characterize the well-being of a child and that influence the likelihood that a child will grow to be a well-educated, economically secure, productive, and healthy adult. The seven domains are family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. This year’s report contains a special feature that uses teacher- and student-reported data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11 (ECLS-K:2011) 3rd-grade collection to describe student victimization of peers at school. Findings from the report indicate: there were 73.6 million children ages 0-17 in the United States in 2016, 1.2 million more than in 2000; in 2016, 69% of children lived with two parents, 23% lived with only their mothers, 4% lived only with their fathers, and 4% lived without a parent in the household; between 1980 and 2015, the percentage of all births to unmarried women increased by 22% to 40%; in 2016, 22% of children were native-born children with at least one foreign-born parent; between 1980 and 2015, the birth rate among adolescents declined from 22 per 1,000 to 10 per 1,000; there were 24.3 maltreated children per 1,000 children under age 1 in 2015, more than twice the rate of any other age group; 20% of children lived in poverty in 2015; only 5% of children in 2015 were without health insurance; and in the spring of 2014, about 6% of 3rd-graders were identified as perpetrators of peer victimization. 173 references and numerous tables and figures. 

Printable version (PDF): https://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2017/ac_17.pdf

Published in Data & Technology

Low-income families face significant challenges navigating both low-wage employment or education and training programs and also finding good-quality child care. Programs that intentionally combine services for parents and children can help families move toward economic security and create conditions that promote child and family well-being. Although these programs in general are not new (see Background), policymakers and program leaders are now experimenting with innovative approaches to combining services. Yet, most currently operating programs, sometimes called “two-generation” or “dual generation” programs, have not yet been rigorously evaluated (Chase-Lansdale and Brooks-Gunn 2014). We conducted a targeted review of publicly available documents and literature. This scan aimed to identify common features of programs operating as of early 2016 that offer integrated services to support both family economic security and child development and well-being (see About This Project). This brief presents the results of the scan related to six key questions:

1. How did programs develop?

2. How mature are these programs?

3. Whom do these programs serve?

4. What services do programs provide to adults and children?

5. How do programs engage both parents and children?

6. How do programs fund their services for parents and children?

 

Read the full report, click here.

Features of Programs Designed to Help Families Achieve Economic Security and Promote Child Well-being.
OPRE Report #2017-49
Sama-Miller, Emily. Baumgartner, Scott.
OPRE.
2017

An important new study was released October 17, 2016. It will soon be published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's the first national large scale study to compare mental health and physical health of foster kids with the general population, including children in economically disadvantaged families. Not surprisingly, it found kids in foster care are: 

  • Seven times as likely to experience depression
  • Six times as likely to exhibit behavioral problems
  • Five times as likely to feel anxiety
  • Three times as likely to have attention deficit disorder, hearing impairments and vision issues
  • Twice as likely to suffer from learning disabilities, developmental delays, asthma, obesity and speech problems

The study is available online at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118

A PDF copy of the report can be accessed here: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2016/10/14/peds.2016-1118.full.pdf

This statement from one of the authors may be particularly of interest:
"This work makes an important contribution to the research community by showing for the first time that foster care children are in considerably worse health than other children. Our findings also present serious implications for pediatricians by suggesting that foster care placement is a risk factor for health problems in childhood."

Information shared by the ABA Center for Children and the Law

This is the second of a series of articles that examines the role that advocates for parents and families can play in furthering the well-being and safety of children. This article highlights emerging parent representation models that expedite the safe reunification of children already in foster care. Written by Vivek S. Sankaran, Patricia L. Rideout and Martha L. Raimon.

"Effective child welfare leaders are not interested in adversarial relationships with parents or their attorneys. They are invested in accomplishing their mission: making sure children, youth and families get what they need so that every child can grow up in a
safe and stable family."    - Patricia L. Rideout, Former Administrator, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Division of Children and Family Services

Click to access the full article.

 

Published in Parents' Attorneys

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