Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care

Best Practices for States   
August 8, 2018  - Urban Institute

ABSTRACT: In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act gave states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have extended or are in the process of extending federally funded foster care with a safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate place to live. There are gaps in our knowledge of best practices for housing young adults in extended care, the housing options currently available to those young adults, and how those options vary across and within states. This brief begins to address these knowledge gaps by gathering information form a purposive sample of officials from public child welfare agencies in states that have extended federally funded foster care to age 21 and a group of stakeholders who attended a convening on the topic. The brief also highlights suggestions for future research.

https://www.urban.org/research/publication/housing-young-adults-extended-federally-funded-foster-care/view/full_report

https://www.urban.org/research/publication/housing-young-adults-extended-federally-funded-foster-care

Published in Children's Justice Act

Every time foster kids move, they lose months of academic progress

Milwaukee Times - April 26, 2018

When 12-year-old Jimmy Wayne's parents dropped him off at a motel and drove away, he became the newest member of the North Carolina Foster Care system. Over the next two years in the foster care system, he attended 12 different schools. "I don't even remember what I learned-no, let me rephrase that-I don't remember what they tried to teach me-after fifth grade," he said recently.

Information Gateway resource: Meeting Educational Needs of Children & Youth in Out-of-Home Care: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/service-array/education-services/meeting-needs/

Published in Children's Justice Act

Promoting Permanency for Teens: A 50 State Review of Law and Policy.
Johnson, Anna. Speiglman, Richard. Mauldon, Jane. Grimm, Bill. Perry, Miranda.
National Center for Youth Law.
2018
https://youthlaw.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Promoting-Permanency-for-Teens.pdf

Promoting Permanency for Teens: A 50 State Review of Law and Policy explores the diversity of state policies and practices for teens in foster care in two potentially competing areas: teens’ need for a permanent connection to a family (either their birth family, or an adoptive or guardian family), and teens’ developmental and practical needs in transitioning to legal adulthood, independence, and self-sufficiency. In the context of these concurrent goals, policies, practices, and programs can serve as incentives or disincentives to pursuing permanency for teens.

New Study Ranks States on How Well They Help Homeless Students. Where Does Your State Rank?

74 - June 25, 2017

Homeless students have long been considered an invisible population in American education policy discussions, but the new federal education law puts a renewed emphasis on identifying and serving them. In recent years, some states have focused on success for displaced youth. However, huge disparities still exist across the country, according to a new report by the Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness.

Also: Out of the Shadows: A State-by-State Ranking of Accountability for Homeless Students: http://www.icphusa.org/national/shadows-state-state-ranking-accountability-homeless-students/

https://www.the74million.org/article/new-study-ranks-states-on-how-well-they-help-homeless-students-where-does-your-state-rank

Published in Children's Justice Act

In October, Rise will start a new writing workshop for young parents who grew up in foster care. Please share the application widely. Since 2012, our 'My Story, My Life' project has amplified the voices of young parents who grew up in foster care through writing, public speaking and collaborations with researchers and policymakers.  

Sponsored by RISE http://www.risemagazine.org/

Published in Youth
Monday, 20 July 2015 00:00

Language in the Youth Movement

Language in the Youth Movement

by Johanna Bergan and Jeremy Long

Please remember, depending on the community or system, these terms may have the same or different meanings so be sure to consider each group separately. The conversation of word meaning will continue with other youth groups nationwide and the plan is to continually build on this document and strengthen its purpose. The facilitated guide used in this project is available for use in any community or system. Please request a facilitator’s guide from Youth M.O.V.E. National by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

www.youthmovenational.org/images/downloads/LanguageintheYouthMOVEmentWebFINAL.pdf

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

Youth Advocate to Advocate for Youth:  The Next Transition 

 by Lacy Kendrick Burk and Johanna Bergan

Advocate for Youth. The steps are not defined by age or other demographic but instead by personal experience. The transition period will take varying lengths of time for each individual to complete. While this guide may be useful for those anywhere on this journey, it may be most applicable to those ages 15-30 and adults who support youth voice.

http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu/pdf/pb-Youth-Advocacy-Guide.pdf

Published in Children's Justice Act