On February 9, 2018, President Donald Trump signed into law the most significant reform to foster care since the federal government got into that business.

This fundamental re-ordering of the government’s role in child welfare extends far beyond the 437,000 children living in foster care today. A 2017 study found that one in three U.S. children will be investigated as victims of child maltreatment by the time they turn 18. That means millions of American children will have the experience of a child abuse investigator coming into their home, questioning whether or not their parents are fit to care for them. This is no niche concern.

Despite the sweeping implications, the debate since the Family First Prevention Services Act was passed has largely been confined to the narrow world of child welfare policy. But, the development portends something much larger: a historic moment in American governance. At a time of ballooning federal deficits and Congressional leaders’ calls for reining in costly “entitlement” programs like Medicaid and Social Security, Family First quietly but significantly expanded the scope of the federal child welfare entitlement, which currently supports only foster care placements and adoptions.

Read the full article: 

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/analysis/foster-care-and-americas-compact-vulnerable-people/31809

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth

This month (June) is Reunification Month—a good time to celebrate family and redouble our efforts to make it possible for more families to be supported in achieving permanency through reunification. As an organization that focuses on older youth, Juvenile Law Center is interested in supporting and expanding ways that safe and sustainable reunification can occur for older youth, including youth who are just entering or at risk of entering the foster care system and young people who have been in care for some period of time, even years. This is the right thing to do because we know achieving permanency will improve transition outcomes, but it is also urgent given the demographics of the child welfare system: in 2016, for example, 22% of youth who entered foster care were age 13 or older.   

Read the rest of the article - click here. 

Blog Post by: Jennifer Pokempner, Child Welfare Policy Director, Juvenile Law Center; Dominique Mikell, Stoneleigh Fellow, Juvenile Law Center; Jennifer Rodriguez, Executive Director, Youth Law Center,

Study: Half of Kids Born to Teen Moms in Foster Care Will Wind Up in Foster Care Themselves

Chronicle of Social Change - June 25, 2018

Half of children born to mothers in foster care will also enter into the child welfare system by their second birthday, according to a study published in this month's issue of the journal Pediatrics. The intergenerational cycle of foster care is a well-known phenomenon to advocates and child welfare workers, but new data illustrates the significance of this pipeline into foster care.

Also: Study: The Cycle of Child Protection Services Involvement: A Cohort Study of Adolescent Mothers: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/141/6/e20173119

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/research-related/study-parenting-foster-youth/31352

Published in Children's Justice Act

Evaluation of the Effects of a Mentoring Program for Youth in Foster Care on Their Criminal Justice Involvement as Young Adults

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention - May 14, 2018

The evaluation of the "My Life" mentoring program for youth in foster care found less criminal offending in early adulthood among male participants.

Report: Extending A Randomized Trial of the My Life Mentoring Model for Youth in Foster Care to Evaluate Long-Term Effects on Offending in Young Adulthood: http://www.corrections.com/system/assets/0000/1319/NCJRS.pdf

http://www.corrections.com/news/article/48171-evaluation-of-the-effects-of-a-mentoring-program-for-youth-in-foster-care-on-their-criminal-justice-involvement-as-young-adults

Published in Data & Technology

May was first declared as National Foster Care Month in 1988. Since then, May has been a time to acknowledge the contributions of foster caregivers and the needs of children in foster care. In 2015, there were an estimated 427,910 children in foster care. A child can be removed from the home and placed in foster care for a variety of reasons including abuse or neglect, parent-child conflict, and the presence of serious physical or behavioral problems in the child that cannot be addressed in the home.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) has compiled a list of helpful resources for birth parents, resource parents, (i.e. foster care, kinship care providers, and adoptive parents), youth, and child welfare and mental health professionals that address the needs of children and adolescents in foster care including mental health treatment, permanency planning, and the transition to independence for older foster care youth.

A list of external resources related to foster care is available here.

Published in Home Page
Monday, 30 April 2018 11:54

(Service) Planning For Your Future

(Service) Planning For Your Future - RISE MAGAZINE FOR FOSTER YOUTH AND FORMER FOSTER YOUTH


Once a child is removed from home, service plans (or case plans) become a crucial part of a parent’s life. Whether parents complete services and change behaviors are the deciding factors in determining whether a child returns home.

Far too often, service planning leaves parents out and ignores the realities in their lives.

In this issue, parents, caseworkers and attorneys share ideas about how to meet parents where they are and prepare them for successful reunification. Stories in this issue were developed in writing workshops at the Center for Family Representation and Graham Windham, and through a workshop for frontline staff at Sheltering Arms.

CLICK TO LINK TO THIS EDITION - May 2018

 

 

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education is pleased to release the latest edition of the Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.

This publication provides a review of data and research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other key stakeholders. These four sections are:

1) A brief data at a glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care;

2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting;

3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care, with accompanying citations; and

4) An overview of some promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care. 

This national factsheet reflects a shift in policy and practice around the country over the past decade. The first edition, released in 2006, included a limited, but consistent, group of research studies, all depicting the poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. The 2006 national factsheet raised awareness about the critical importance of prioritizing education for students in foster care. For more than a decade, through the leadership of the National Working Group on Foster Care and Education (National Working Group), with support from various foundations including Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Stuart Foundation, several revised editions of this factsheet have been released, including this 2018 version.

We now have a growing body of research that reflects the educational needs of this group of students, most of which still indicates that students in foster care face significant educational challenges. Fortunately, we also have a growing number of federal and state laws that provide rights and protections for students in foster care, and many promising programs and interventions designed to address a wide range of factors influencing the disparities in education outcomes. With cross-system collaboration and the implementation of improved federal and state policies, we are positioned to build on what is being learned, bring about change, and promote success for all children and youth in foster care. We are grateful to the National Work Group members who have provided information to make this resource a valuable compilation of data, research, and promising interventions. This publication was compiled by the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a project of the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, in partnership with the Education Law Center and Juvenile Law Center.

We encourage you to share this resource with your networks.

Sneha Barve

Staff Attorney, Center on Children and the Law American Bar Association

1050 Connecticut Ave.

Suite 400

Washington, DC 20036

 

T:  202.442.3344

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Friends of Children launching program to help young adults out of foster care (Includes video)

WWLP - March 22, 2018

The nationwide program called FOCUS pairs those who have aged out of foster care with adults who provide resources for young men and women entering adulthood.

http://wwlp.com/2018/03/22/friends-of-children-launching-program-to-help-young-adults-out-of-foster-care/

Published in Children's Justice Act
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