New Study Ranks States on How Well They Help Homeless Students. Where Does Your State Rank?

74 - June 25, 2017

Homeless students have long been considered an invisible population in American education policy discussions, but the new federal education law puts a renewed emphasis on identifying and serving them. In recent years, some states have focused on success for displaced youth. However, huge disparities still exist across the country, according to a new report by the Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness.

Also: Out of the Shadows: A State-by-State Ranking of Accountability for Homeless Students: http://www.icphusa.org/national/shadows-state-state-ranking-accountability-homeless-students/

https://www.the74million.org/article/new-study-ranks-states-on-how-well-they-help-homeless-students-where-does-your-state-rank

Published in Children's Justice Act
Wednesday, 14 June 2017 09:42

ABA Homeless Youth Legal Network

Update on the ABA Homeless Youth Legal Network

The Network was formed to provide information and foster collaboration in order to help attorneys and other advocates address existing gaps in legal services, and to improve outcomes for homeless youth and young adults. In just the past few months, the Network has:

  • Launched a website, www.ambar.org/HYLN, which contains additional information about the Network, and will be a repository for resources related to meeting homeless youth’s legal needs.
  • Surveyed over 300 individuals/groups about the legal needs of youth in their community (if you have not yet participated, please consider completing our survey at http://bit.ly/2mMGYl9).
  • Launched a listserv for attorneys and other advocates for homeless youth with over 250 members (to join, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).
  • Selected 12 Model Programs providing legal services to youth across the country (learn more at www.ambar.org/HYLN).
  • Began providing training and technical assistance to legal services providers and homelessness programs (to request free T/TA please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). 

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

A Guide for Child Protective Services Staff - Protecting Children with Disabilities from Abuse and Neglect

Authors

  • Scott J. Modell, Ph.D., Deputy Commissioner, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee
  • Marcie Davis, M.S., Director, Underserved Populations, New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, Inc.
  • Carla Aaron, M.S.S.W., Executive Director, Office of Child Safety, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee
  • Irma Buchanan, M.S.S.W., Director of Investigations, Office of Child Safety, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee

In 2011, the average annual rate of violent victimization for children with disabilities was more than twice the rate among children without disabilities. Serious violent victimization for children with disabilities was more than three times than that for children without disabilities (Truman & Planty, 2012). In the U.S., victimization is increasing for individuals with disabilities. Average annual rates from 2009-2011 tell a story. Children with intellectual disabilities had the highest rate of violent victimization from 2009 to 2011.

Among children with intellectual disabilities, the average annual rate of serious violent victimization doubled from 2009 to 2011. The average annual rate of serious violent victimization against individuals with self-care disabilities more than tripled from 2009 to 2011. The average annual rate of serious violent victimization against individuals with multiple disability types was double compared to individuals with one disability type (a net result of four times the victimization than persons without disabilities) (Harrell, 2011; Harrell, 2012). Data meta-analysis (Spencer et al., 2005; Sullivan
& Knutson, 2000) indicates that children with intellectual disabilities are:

  • 2.9 - 3.7 times as likely to have been neglected
  • 3.4 - 3.8 times as likely to be emotionally abused
  • 3.8 - 5.3 times as likely to be physically abused
  • 4.0 - 6.4 times as likely to be sexually abused

Almost fifty percent of people with developmental disabilities who are victims of sexual abuse will experience 10 or more abusive incidents (Valenti-Hein & Schwartz, 1995). According to a study involving the sexual abuse of persons with disabilities, almost eighty percent were sexually assaulted on more than one occasion and fifty percent of those experienced more than 10 victimizations (Sobsey, & Doe, 1991). People with disabilities are more likely to experience severe abuse over longer durations with multiple incidences and multiple abusers (Schaller & Fieberg, 1998; Young et al.,
1997). 

Child abuse normally occurs in the framework of a relationship between a child and an adult, or when the adult is a caregiver. Abuse or neglect is more likely to occur if the child and the caregiver exhibit certain risk factors. If there is a lack of protective factors to intervene with the risk factors present in their lives, then that family is at a greater risk of child abuse.

Read the full document. Click on the attached file.

Protecting Children with Disabilities from Sexual Assault - A Parent's Guide

Written by
Marcie Davis and Scott J. Modell, Ph.D.
Published by
New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Inc.

Individuals with disabilities experience victimization of violent crimes at greater rates than those without disabilities. Sorensen (2002) reported that major crimes against people with disabilities are underreported when compared to the general population and estimated that individuals with disabilities are over four times more likely to be victims of crime than are people without disabilities. The risk of being a victim of crime, especially a victim of sexual assault, is 4 to 10 times higher for someone with a disability. Research studies (Powers, 2004; Nosek, 2001; Sobsey, 1994; Petersilia, 1998; Waxman, 1991) consistently report that there is a very high rate of sexual violence against people with physical and cognitive disabilities, as well as, those with significant speech/communication disabilities.


Furthermore, the risk of sexual violence appears to increase with the degree of disability (Sobsey & Varnhagen, 1988). Compounding the physical and mental trauma of violence, crime victims with disabilities are less likely to seek medical attention and report the victimization to law enforcement due to limited access to the criminal justice system.

 

Read the full document - click on the attached file. 

Violence Against Children with Disabilities: What Foster Parents Need to Know

Authors

  • Scott J. Modell, Ph.D., Deputy Commissioner, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee
  • Marcie Davis, M.S., Project Director, New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, Inc.
  • Carla Aaron, M.S.S.W., Executive Director, Office of Child Safety, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee
  • Amy Coble, M.S., Director of Investigations, Office of Child Safety, Department of Children’s Services, State of Tennessee

Children with disabilities are often targeted for abuse. The risk of abuse is even greater for children with disabilities in foster care. As a foster parent of a child with a disability, this guide is designed to help you have the information necessary to keep your child safe.
While child abuse, neglect, exploitation and sexual assault can affect any child, children with disabilities are at greater risk of maltreatment than children without disabilities. Child maltreatment is generally defined using the Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA): “The term ‘child abuse and neglect’ means, at a minimum, any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caretaker, which results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act which presents an imminent risk of serious harm” (42 U.S.C.A. §5106g). Each State provides definitions of child maltreatment in law, most commonly in four categories: physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, and emotional maltreatment.

To read the full content, click on the attached file. 

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education (http://www.fostercareandeducation.org) would like to share important news regarding the issuance of final federal regulations by the U.S. Department of Education implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This link will guide you to the regulations released on November 28, 2016: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/essaaccountstplans1129.pdf.

There are several key provisions in these regulations important to children in foster care, but the language addressing transportation is most timely given impending deadlines.  The regulations clarify the obligation of education and child welfare agencies to provide transportation during disputes over payment of any "additional costs" of transportation to maintain children's school stability.  Specifically, the regulations reinforce the responsibility of the State Education Agencies (SEAs) to:

  • Ensure that children in foster care promptly receive transportation, as necessary, to and from their schools of origin when in the children's best interest.
  • Ensure that LEAs that receive funding under Title I collaborate with child welfare agencies to develop and implement clear written transportation procedures that describe how school stability will be ensured in the event of a dispute over which agency or agencies will pay for any additional costs incurred.
  • Ensure that LEAs' local transportation procedures describe which agency or agencies will initially pay the additional costs so that transportation is provided to children in foster care during the pendency of any funding disputes.

These regulations send a clear message that providing transportation to achieve school stability for children in foster care is of paramount importance and that SEAs as well as LEAs, in collaboration with local child welfare agencies, have a clear duty to ensure that transportation is promptly provided.  Neither ESSA nor this regulation specifically allocate the responsibility to fund additional costs to either LEAs or local child welfare agencies.  Rather, this new regulation clarifies that state and local educational agencies have bottom line responsibility for developing and implementing procedures that guarantee school stability transportation for all children in foster care when disputes arise - and during the pendency of disputes - over which agency or agencies will fund any additional costs incurred.

These regulations go into effect January 30, 2017. However, it is important to remember that the provisions in ESSA relating to school stability, prompt school enrollment, and transportation to ensure school stability for children in foster care go into effect on December 10, 2016. State and local child welfare and education agencies must immediately begin or continue conversations about their shared responsibility to support the school stability and the success of students in foster care.  In order to ensure consistency across all districts within a state, the U.S. Department of Education has encouraged SEAs to issue uniform statewide guidance on how disputes should be resolved regarding which agency or agencies will fund transportation (including funding for transportation pending those disputes) and to establish a common dispute resolution process at the state level.

We look forward to continuing to support this work in your state, and encourage you to please contact us with questions or updates.

Kristin Kelly, Esq.

American Bar Association

Center on Children and the Law

1050 Connecticut Avenue NW, 4th Floor

Washington, DC 20036

(202) 662-1733

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This policy report provides an overview of the challenges foster youth confront when pursuing a postsecondary credential, focuses on the treatment of these youth by state financial aid programs, and offers potential remedies that state policy leaders may pursue to increase successful outcomes for this population.

AUTHOR(S): Brian A. Sponsler, Emily Parker, Molly Sarubbi

Sponsored by: Education Commission of the States

Download the Report

Published in Children's Justice Act

In October, Rise will start a new writing workshop for young parents who grew up in foster care. Please share the application widely. Since 2012, our 'My Story, My Life' project has amplified the voices of young parents who grew up in foster care through writing, public speaking and collaborations with researchers and policymakers.  

Sponsored by RISE http://www.risemagazine.org/

Published in Youth
For most young people, family is there to lend a hand with things like rent, groceries, and support as they make the first few steps into adulthood. Unless they’ve been in foster care. Fostering Change commissioned this research to provide an economic perspective on the challenges and opportunities associated with youth aging out of government care. Over three reports we consider:
 
(1) current educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes;
(2) the costs of those outcomes; and
(3) the costs of increased supports in relation to the potential savings and benefits they offer.
 
This series of reports offers important new insights into the economic consequences and issues for youth aging out of care. To our knowledge, no previous study in BC has attempted to estimate the costs of current outcomes and the potential benefits from better preparing and supporting youth from care in the early years of their adulthood.
 
The findings are very clear. First, youth aging out of government care do not receive the same financial, social and other supports that most young people receive from their parents. Second, educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes are poor for many youth aging out of government care. Third, the immediate and long-term costs of these adverse outcomes are very high — hundreds of millions of dollars every year. Last, the cost of increased supports is small relative to the potential savings and benefits to youth from care, and to society as a whole.
OPPORTUNITIES IN TRANSITION:
An Economic Analysis of Investing
in Youth Aging out of Foster Care
READ THE FULL REPORT, CLICK HERE.
Published in Data & Technology
Page 1 of 2

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