This paper reviews factors that impact the likelihood that a permanent placement will be attained for a child in care. It begins with a review of system-level factors that act as barriers to permanency, including problems in recruiting and retaining prospective foster and adoptive families, high caseloads and turnover among child welfare workers, inadequate resources to assist families, and an overcrowded court system. Case-level factors that may inhibit a child’s likelihood of obtaining a permanent home are then reviewed and include a prior removal history, placement stability, initial placement, and reason for removal. Finally, the paper reviews child and family level factors that impact permanency outcomes, including demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, age, race/ ethnicity), physical and mental disabilities, and parental substance use and mental health. Programs and initiatives that have been implemented to support positive permanency outcomes are then highlighted, as well as key federal legislation related to improving permanency outcomes. The need for increased research to identify successful strategies to recruit and retain foster and adoptive families is emphasized. 19 references. 

Link to Report

Title: Achieving Permanency for Children in Care: Barriers and Future Directions. 
Author(s): Madden, Elissa E.;Aguiniga, Donna M. 
Published: 2017 
Available from: Upbring (formerly Lutheran Social Services of the South) 
https://www.upbring.org/ 
8305 Cross Park Drive 
Austin, TX 78754 

This report presents the findings of a study that investigated transformational relationships between youth and social services workers. The research explored how transformational relationships work, the attributes of workers who are particularly good at creating transformational relationships, and the attributes of organizations that successfully promote transformational relationships. Data was collected through more than 80 interviews with youth, workers, and organization leaders in the United States and the United Kingdom. Following an introduction, the first section describes worker behaviors that helped to build transformational relationships, including listening, persistence over time, being “real”, challenging the youth, showing up in crises, and showing love. Challenges identified by youth that were helped through transformational relationships are then discussed and include: stress, the difficulty of experiencing and recognizing emotions, negative self-perception and shame, and powerlessness and lack of agency. Additional sections explain the transformational relationships helped youth see that they matter, imagine a different future, develop an emerging sense of power and agency, and develop a capacity to self-regulate. Key characteristics of effective workers who were able to develop transformational relationships with youth are described, including optimism and emotional maturity, and important similarities of organizations that excelled at creating a context in which transformational relationships flourish are discussed, including having relationships at the heart of practice, meeting critical needs, embedding relationships as one part of a broader practice model, hiring and supervising workers who have the capacity to excel at relating to youth, making substantial efforts to relate to workers in ways that model how they want workers to related to youth, and tracking the status of relationships. The report closes with recommendations to organizational and system leaders. 3 references. 

Published: 2017 
Available from: Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) 
http://www.cssp.org/ 

1575 Eye Street N.W., Suite 500 
Washington, DC 20005 
Printable version (PDF): https://www.cssp.org/pages/body/Transformational-Relationships-for-Youth-Success-Report.pdf

Published in Children's Justice Act

This Adolescent Trauma and Substance Abuse (ATSA) online course was developed to provide training and materials for mental health clinicians, substance abuse treatment providers, parents, caregivers, and youth on the complex intersections between psychological trauma and co-occurring substance abuse and dependency. The course includes an interactive online module on “Understanding Traumatic Stress and Substance Abuse Among Adolescents,” a webinar and lecture presentation featuring expert faculty from the NCTSN, and a four-part Train-the-Trainer video series entitled “Trauma and Co-Occurring Disorders: Understanding and Working with Youth and Their Caregivers.”

You will need to go to the site first and register - then you can go to the course. Link to NCTSN: https://learn.nctsn.org/login/index.php 

2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Support.
National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth (NCFY). Runaway and Homeless Youth Program, Family and Youth Services Bureau. National Runaway Safeline (NRS).
2017
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/fysb/nrs_crisis_contacts_report_1.pdf

Pathways to Tribal Title IV-E: Tribal Title IV-E Options.
Child Welfare Capacity Building Collaborative.
2017
https://tribalinformationexchange.org/files/products/Pathways_to_Tribal_IV-E.pdf

The Collaborative is a partnership among three centers — the Center for Tribes, Center for States, and Center for Courts. This new structure is designed to help child welfare agencies and courts in states, tribes, and territories to build capacity and improve practice. The Collaborative, consisting of three Centers, delivers services that are innovative, outcome -driven, and informed by the best available data and evidence.

The Children's Bureau provides matching funds to tribal organizations, states, and territories to help them operate every aspect of their child welfare systems — from the prevention of child abuse and neglect to the support of permanent placements through adoption and subsidized guardianship. Title IV-E of the Social Security Act provides funds for tribes and states to provide foster care, transitional independent living programs for children, guardianship assistance, and adoption assistance for children with special needs. Pathways to Tribal Title IV-E is provided for informational purposes and to assist tribes in determining if applying for direct Title IV-E funding or pursuing a Tribal -State Agreement might be an option for their tribe. Of course, all Tribal Nations are unique and possess their own customs, traditions and the way they work on a day-to-day basis. It is important for tribes to understand Title IV-E requirements when considering direct Title IV-E funding or a Tribal-State Agreement which are detailed in the federal Title IV-E statute, regulations and official Children’s Bureau policy.
 
In this document you will find the following information:
•Authority for Tribal/State Agreements and Direct Funding
•Direct Title IV-E Program
•Overview and Requirements for Accessing Title IV-E Funding
•Scope of the Title IV-E Program
•Resources to Assist Tribes
 
 
 
 

A new report completed by Child Trends, under contract to the Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation at the Administration for Children and Families, examines Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education (HMRE) programs. HMRE programs aim to help youth form healthy relationships and, eventually, healthy marriages (and avoid unhealthy ones) by improving their attitudes, knowledge, skills, and expectations around romantic relationships. This report builds on research that finds that young people's romantic relationships can influence their behaviors and experiences (both positive and negative) during adolescence and beyond.

The report finds that most HMRE programs target and reach diverse-and often disadvantaged-youth populations in a variety of settings. However, these reach more youth ages 14 to 17 than in the 18 to 24 age range, which leads the authors to recommend providing more programs targeted at older youth. Read more about the report's findings and recommendations at acf.hhs.gov.

 

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges recently passed resolutions and policy statements on how to improve the lives of youth and families involved with juvenile or family courts. The resolutions address the needs of homeless youth and families, support a developmental approach to juvenile probation, and recognize the need for independent oversight of youth confinement facilities. The Council also released two bench cards: one with guidance on working with youth regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, and one on applying principles of adolescent development in delinquency proceedings. In addition, the Council released a guide of principles and practices addressing custody and visitation.

Published in Home Page
Wednesday, 23 August 2017 16:30

Southwest Louisiana Foster Care Coalition

Young adults aging out of foster care have been a large concern not only for our nation, but our community. Some of these individuals will turn eighteen with no connections or resources. As a result, the City of Lake Charles established a committee to help combat this crisis.

The coalition is made up of individuals from various organizations. However, their goal is the same. The goal is to help these young adults by providing them with the tools and guidance to reach their full potential. This document was created by the AmeriCorps Vista members to work on the daily operations to achieve this goal. These young adults are our future. Therefore, it is our responsibility to do all we can to help them.

This website has regional and state resources that are available for foster youth and families.

http://www.swlafostercare.com/

 

Published in Youth

The growing awareness of human trafficking in the United States and abroad requires government and human services agencies to reevaluate old policies and develop new ones for identifying and serving victims. Due to their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability, children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers who are actively seeking children1 to exploit. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare agencies be at the forefront of the response to and prevention of human trafficking. Additionally, recent Federal legislation established new requirements for child welfare agencies related to identifying and serving minor victims of human trafficking.

1 For the purposes of this report, the term “children” includes youth. The term “youth” is used when source materials specifically reference that population.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE (in attached file)

Child welfare caseworkers can be an invaluable resource in helping communities respond to the human trafficking of children. Children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers because of their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare caseworkers be at the forefront of efforts to identify, respond to, and prevent human trafficking. This bulletin explores how caseworkers can identify and support children who have been victimized as well as children that are at greater risk for future victimization. It provides background information about the issue, strategies caseworkers can use to identify and support victims and potential victims, and tools and resources that can assist caseworkers.

READ THE FULL DOCUMENT

Page 2 of 4

Upcoming Events

June

July