For most young people, family is there to lend a hand with things like rent, groceries, and support as they make the first few steps into adulthood. Unless they’ve been in foster care. Fostering Change commissioned this research to provide an economic perspective on the challenges and opportunities associated with youth aging out of government care. Over three reports we consider:
 
(1) current educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes;
(2) the costs of those outcomes; and
(3) the costs of increased supports in relation to the potential savings and benefits they offer.
 
This series of reports offers important new insights into the economic consequences and issues for youth aging out of care. To our knowledge, no previous study in BC has attempted to estimate the costs of current outcomes and the potential benefits from better preparing and supporting youth from care in the early years of their adulthood.
 
The findings are very clear. First, youth aging out of government care do not receive the same financial, social and other supports that most young people receive from their parents. Second, educational, economic, social and wellness outcomes are poor for many youth aging out of government care. Third, the immediate and long-term costs of these adverse outcomes are very high — hundreds of millions of dollars every year. Last, the cost of increased supports is small relative to the potential savings and benefits to youth from care, and to society as a whole.
OPPORTUNITIES IN TRANSITION:
An Economic Analysis of Investing
in Youth Aging out of Foster Care
READ THE FULL REPORT, CLICK HERE.
Published in Data & Technology
Monday, 08 August 2016 08:58

RISE Magazine

Rise Magazine

Rise magazine is written by parents who have faced the child welfare system in their own lives. Many people don’t know that the majority of children who enter foster care return home to their parents–and that most children in care wish for a lifelong relationship with their parents, whether they live with them or not. Helping parents is fundamental to helping children in foster care.

Through personal essays and reporting, parents illuminate every aspect of the child welfare experience from parents’ perspectives. Sign up for a free individual subscription or purchase print copies to hand out to parents and child welfare staff. For professionals, Rise stories offer insight that can improve how you engage and support fragile families. For parents, Rise offers information, peer support, and hope.

http://www.risemagazine.org/rise-magazine/ 

Published in Parents' Attorneys
Page 4 of 4

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