America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2017

 The 20th in a series, this report presents a set of 41 key indicators that measure important aspects of children's lives. It draws on various overarching frameworks to identify seven major domains that characterize the well-being of a child and that influence the likelihood that a child will grow to be a well-educated, economically secure, productive, and healthy adult. The seven domains are family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. This year’s report contains a special feature that uses teacher- and student-reported data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11 (ECLS-K:2011) 3rd-grade collection to describe student victimization of peers at school. Findings from the report indicate: there were 73.6 million children ages 0-17 in the United States in 2016, 1.2 million more than in 2000; in 2016, 69% of children lived with two parents, 23% lived with only their mothers, 4% lived only with their fathers, and 4% lived without a parent in the household; between 1980 and 2015, the percentage of all births to unmarried women increased by 22% to 40%; in 2016, 22% of children were native-born children with at least one foreign-born parent; between 1980 and 2015, the birth rate among adolescents declined from 22 per 1,000 to 10 per 1,000; there were 24.3 maltreated children per 1,000 children under age 1 in 2015, more than twice the rate of any other age group; 20% of children lived in poverty in 2015; only 5% of children in 2015 were without health insurance; and in the spring of 2014, about 6% of 3rd-graders were identified as perpetrators of peer victimization. 173 references and numerous tables and figures. 

Printable version (PDF): https://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2017/ac_17.pdf