Susan Delle Shaffette

This month (June) is Reunification Month—a good time to celebrate family and redouble our efforts to make it possible for more families to be supported in achieving permanency through reunification. As an organization that focuses on older youth, Juvenile Law Center is interested in supporting and expanding ways that safe and sustainable reunification can occur for older youth, including youth who are just entering or at risk of entering the foster care system and young people who have been in care for some period of time, even years. This is the right thing to do because we know achieving permanency will improve transition outcomes, but it is also urgent given the demographics of the child welfare system: in 2016, for example, 22% of youth who entered foster care were age 13 or older.   

Read the rest of the article - click here. 

Blog Post by: Jennifer Pokempner, Child Welfare Policy Director, Juvenile Law Center; Dominique Mikell, Stoneleigh Fellow, Juvenile Law Center; Jennifer Rodriguez, Executive Director, Youth Law Center,

Groundbreaking Research Reveals America's Attitudes, Public Perceptions and Dominant Narratives about Native People and Native Issues, and Provides Opportunities for "Reclaiming Native Truth" (Press release)

First Nations Development Institute - June 27, 2018

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) and Echo Hawk Consulting (EHC) today released groundbreaking research about attitudes toward and perceptions of Native Americans as part of a jointly-managed effort called Reclaiming Native Truth: A Project to Dispel America's Myths and Misconceptions. The project also released two messaging guides based on the research findings and a narrative-change strategy framework that will be used to begin to change the false and misleading narratives about Native peoples. More issue-specific narrative messages written around key issues - mascots, the Indian Child Welfare Act, tribal sovereignty and pop culture depictions of Native Americans - find similar validation.

Also: Government student appointed to national commission on native children: http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?PID=18495&mid=279915

Also: Information Gateway resource: Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA): https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/diverse-populations/americanindian/icwa/

http://org2.salsalabs.com/o/5855/t/0/blastContent.jsp?email_blast_KEY=1417089

How Prevalent is Opioid Abuse?

Opioid abuse is a problem in Louisiana where almost all indicators … addiction to opioid medications, overdose deaths, emergency room admissions and over-prescribing … are evidence of the problem. 

A link for LDH’s website with Opioid related information is as follows: Opioid Get Help navigation

Additional Documents are attached:

FINAL Opioid Substance Abuse Status Report

SAMHSA Overdose Toolkit

Opioid Epidemic PPT

CY 2016 - Valid Drug/Alcohol Affected Newborn Victims - Chart

 

Study: Half of Kids Born to Teen Moms in Foster Care Will Wind Up in Foster Care Themselves

Chronicle of Social Change - June 25, 2018

Half of children born to mothers in foster care will also enter into the child welfare system by their second birthday, according to a study published in this month's issue of the journal Pediatrics. The intergenerational cycle of foster care is a well-known phenomenon to advocates and child welfare workers, but new data illustrates the significance of this pipeline into foster care.

Also: Study: The Cycle of Child Protection Services Involvement: A Cohort Study of Adolescent Mothers: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/141/6/e20173119

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/research-related/study-parenting-foster-youth/31352

SAMHSA Child Mental Health Event Promotes Trauma-Informed Approach

Psychiatric News (American Psychiatric Association) - June 08, 2018

Mental health is essential to a child’s healthy development. That was the message highlighted this year by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) during National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day last month. To mark the day, SAMHSA hosted a special event at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., under the theme “Partnering for Health and Hope Following Trauma.” The event brought together governors’ spouses, senior federal officials, and organization executives representing the fields of primary care, behavioral health, and child welfare, including APA and the APA Foundation, for an interactive town hall. The event also featured trauma survivors, youth who had experienced mental illness, and their family members.

"Young people who have experienced trauma are more likely to develop mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders, McCance-Katz said. "We also know that trauma increases the probability that young people will develop physical problems like cardiovascular diseases later in life." Trauma, she said, includes adverse childhood experiences such as sexual, physical, and other kinds of abuse.

A new report by SAMHSA indicates that 82 percent of children receiving community-based mental health services have had traumatic experiences. After receiving services through SAMHSA’s Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI), which addresses the needs of children, youth, and young adults with serious emotional disturbance, suicidal thoughts among those who experienced trauma decreased by 68 percent, and suicide attempts decreased by 78 percent. In addition, the number of arrests declined while school attendance and performance improved.

“Evidence-based, trauma-informed care models such as those supported by SAMHSA are effective in improving outcomes for children and youth,” McCance-Katz said.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE - CLICK HERE

RESOURCES: 

Also: Improving Life Outcomes for Children with History of Mental Health Challenges and Trauma (Press release): https://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201805090400

Also: Helping Children and Youth Who Have Traumatic Experiences (SAMHSA report): https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/brief_report_natl_childrens_mh_awareness_day.pdf

https://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.pn.2018.6b17

June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID
June 25, 2018

A new law could help prevent child sexual abuse on youth sports teams this summer. After hundreds of cases of abuse within the USA women's gymnastics team were revealed last year, Congress passed the Safe Sport Act in January. Under the law, youth sports organizations are required to give sexual abuse prevention training, and report abuse allegations to local law enforcement. With summer sports warming up, organizations are looking at how to stay in line with these new policies. "So many good things happen in sporting organizations, and young people and adolescents blossom into these really great adults, partly because of the experience and the coaching that they get, and all those kind of things,” says David Duro, president and CEO of Treasure Valley Family YMCA. “But not everybody can be trusted with our children." Duro adds that volunteers at his YMCA already go through sexual abuse prevention training. 

Duro says this type of crime is prevalent, perhaps even more so than the public knows. According to Darkness to Light, an organization that provides training and resources for preventing sexual abuse, one in four girls, and one in six boys, will be abused by the time she or he is 18. "The incidence of child sexual abuse is just so high, and this one act isn't going to flip the dial,” he states. “I mean, it's going to be constant and rigorous diligence to reverse this trend and to, at some point, eradicate child sexual abuse."  The new law also includes mandatory compensation of at least $150,000 for victims of sexual abuse, and requires that sports organizations put reasonable procedures in place to limit one-on-one interactions between minors and adults. It also sets up an independent, nonprofit body – the U.S. Center for SafeSport – to ensure compliance and investigate abuse complaints.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID

HRC Foundation's All Children - All Families has designed, "Field Forward" for professionals and advocates in child welfare. This monthly newsletter offers best practice resources based on challenges and inquiries that you and your peers are currently navigating -- allowing you to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to supporting and serving LGBTQ youth and families. Each newsletter will also feature the latest child welfare resources, share examples of how agencies like yours are leading the field, and much more!

To learn more about All Children - All Families or to participate on behalf of your agency, visit hrc.org/acafRegister for our free online learning offerings, covering promising practices in serving LGBTQ children, youth and families!

Casey Family Programs is accepting nominations for our annual Casey Excellence for Children Awards that recognize outstanding families and foster care alumni who have dedicated themselves to improving outcomes for children and families in the foster care system. Please nominate a hero — a foster care alumnus, birth parent, foster or adoptive parent, or kinship caregiver — who is committed to building hope for children, families and their communities. Submit nominations by 5 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, by clicking here

Previous nominees may be re-nominated, but previous winners are not eligible. We will review nominations in August and notify the nominating parties and winners in late fall. For more guidance or inspiration, learn about our 2018 winners. Award recipients will be invited to Seattle to be recognized at a special awards reception and Casey Family Programs' 2019 Annual All-Staff Meeting. The award winner and a guest will receive paid travel and lodging for the awards event (including per diem). Winners will receive a $500 honorarium, a customized award, a copy of a video about their work and a framed photo from the event. They will also be featured in a press release. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with questions.

Here is a link to helpful ICWA resources – it also includes the ICWA 2016 final regulations.

https://www.indianaffairs.gov/bia/ois/dhs/icwa

Additionally, I have included questions and answers from last session that were either not addressed during the session or needed further research. 

 

Question 1:  So ... the outline says clear and convincing for ICWA removal ... but Brooke said beyond a reasonable doubt.

Answer:  The outline is correct, the standard for removal is clear and convincing evidence.  Beyond a reasonable doubt however, is the standard in TPR cases for ICWA.  If I said during the course that beyond a reasonable doubt applies to removal, it was just me mis-speaking.  To reiterate:

Removal = clear and convincing

TPR = beyond a reasonable doubt

 

Question 2: Would the Youngberg v. Romeo case include foster children in its definition of "institutionalized" children who are dependent on the state?

Answer:  Yes, it includes any person who is in the custody of the state (ie – foster care, detention, jail, mental health institution).  There have been a number of class action law suits on behalf of children in foster care alleging that the state was not adequately providing for their care. 

 

Question 3:  The Red Book was not clear about whether ICWA actually applies to delinquency cases (DL cases). You said ICWA is inapplicable in DL cases. Are there any recent cases or does this remain unsettled law?

Answer:  ICWA does not apply to juvenile delinquency proceedings in which the alleged crime committed by the child would also be a crime if committed by an adult – with the following caveat: ICWA may also apply in a juvenile delinquency proceeding where the basis for the proceeding is a criminal act by the child, but the proposed out-of-home placement is based upon the fitness of the parents rather than the criminal act by the child.

ICWA does apply to status offenses – those that would not be a crime if committed by an adult. 

 

 

Best Regards,

Brooke N. Silverthorn, JD, CWLS

Director of Legal and Policy Advocacy
National Association of Counsel for Children
13123 E. 16th Avenue, B390
Aurora, CO  80045
(303) 864-5323

                  

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