Tuesday, 27 March 2018 10:13

Louisiana Bench Cards for Judges

Louisiana Bench Cards for Judges - most recently updated in 2015. This set covers:

Entry Order

Evaluation Order

TRO/Protective Order

Instanter Custody/Safety Plan Order

Continued Custody Hearing (CINC)

Continued custody Hearing (FINS/Delinquency)

Appearance to Answer

Adjudication Hearing

Disposition Hearing

Case Review Hearing

Permanency Hearing – Reunification

Permanency Hearing – Adoption (including TPR)

Permanency Hearing – Legal Guardianship

Permanency Hearing – Placement with Relative

Permanency Hearing – Alternative Permanent Living Arrangement

 

Please click on the attached file to open the pdf of the document. 

Published in Judges

The Capacity Building Center for Courts has created a Domestic Child Sex Trafficking Judicial Desk Reference Guide.  This resource provides links and examples of how Court Improvement Programs (CIP) can implement P.L. 113-183.  Specifically, it addresses:

 

How to form a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to measure your success as a 113-183 Task Force

 

How to identify victims and potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to identify and provide services for victims/potential victims of Trafficking

 

How to be (Trafficking) Trauma-Informed and how to conduct a Trauma audit of your court

 

The PDF version is attached here and the web link to the resource is: file:///C:/Users/lesli/Downloads/113-183BenchReference-_ColorFixed-md4_jd4_cm-md-QF.PDF

 

Take Care,

 

Leslie Briner, MSW

P.L. 113-183 Sex Trafficking Constituency Group Lead

CAPACITY BUILDING CENTER FOR STATES

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Press Release

National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges - October 31, 2017

Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) in 1978 to address the widespread practice of state entities removing American Indian and Alaskan Native children from their homes and families. Congressional findings memorialized in ICWA included "an alarmingly high percentage of Indian families are broken up by the removal, often unwarranted, of their children from them by non-tribal public and private agencies and that a high percentage of such children are placed in non-Indian foster and adoptive homes and institutions." "In order to best serve the children and families of our community, we must develop and support collaboration between state and tribal court systems," said Hon. Richard Blake, Hoopa Valley Tribe, president, National American Indian Court Judges Association.

Benchbook: http://www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/files/NCJFCJ_ICWA_Judicial_Benchbook_Final_Web.pdf

http://www.ncjfcj.org/ICWABenchbook

 

 

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges recently passed resolutions and policy statements on how to improve the lives of youth and families involved with juvenile or family courts. The resolutions address the needs of homeless youth and families, support a developmental approach to juvenile probation, and recognize the need for independent oversight of youth confinement facilities. The Council also released two bench cards: one with guidance on working with youth regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, and one on applying principles of adolescent development in delinquency proceedings. In addition, the Council released a guide of principles and practices addressing custody and visitation.

Published in Home Page

The US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families and Office for Civil Rights have compiled documents that provide guidance to ensure that child welfare agencies and state court systems are aware of their responsibilities to protect the civil rights of children and families in the child welfare system. The attached documents will address policy for Title VI, Disabilities, and Disproportionality issues.

Determining if a Child is Safe

The basic and most important determination judges make in child in need of care cases is whether a child(ren) is safe. Critical safety decisions are made when removing a child and determining whether a child should return home. However, without a comprehensive decision-making structure and thorough inquiry, decisions can lead to over and under removal, leaving children unsafe or returning them home too quickly. 

The Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) has implemented a research-based, structured safety assessment process designed to avoid these problems. It is the responsibility of all individuals involved in a case to understand the goal of child safety, the terminology used when discussing safety, and the type of information needed to make good decisions about child safety.

This bulletin was developed in 2016 by the Pelican Center for Children and Families with assistance from ABA Center for Children and the Law and the Pelican Center/Louisiana Child Welfare Training Academy Training and Education Committee members. Please download and share!

 

Published in Law and Best Practices

The ABA Center on Children and the Law, in collaboration with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, is pleased to announce the release of "TRAUMA: What Child Welfare Attorneys Should Know." This resource provides practical information about trauma-informed legal advocacy by attorneys representing children, parents, and child welfare agencies.

In furtherance of the American Bar Association's policy on trauma-informed legal practice, this resource can strengthen advocacy, improve attorney-client relationships, and promote appropriate screening, in-depth assessment, and evidence-based treatment. In addition, awareness of secondary traumatic stress can improve prevention, identification, and self-care among legal professionals.

The resource was developed by the NCTSN Justice Consortium Attorney Work Group, co-chaired by Christopher Branson, Ph.D., Carly Baetz, JD, Ph.D., and Eva Klain, JD (ABA Center on Children and the Law).

Published in Attorneys

Kinship care families: New policy can guide pediatricians to address needs

Sarah H. Springer, M.D., FAAP
 
 

A growing body of evidence suggests that children who cannot live with their biological parents fare better overall when living with extended family than with nonrelated foster parents. Acknowledging the benefits of kinship care arrangements, federal laws and public policies increasingly favor placing children with family members rather than in nonrelative foster care.

Despite overall better outcomes, families providing kinship care endure many hardships, and the children experience many of the same adversities as children in traditional foster care.

A new AAP policy statement from the Council on Foster Care, Adoption and Kinship Care outlines the unique strengths and vulnerabilities of these children and families, and offers strategies for pediatricians to help them to thrive. The policy, Needs of Kinship Care Families and Pediatric Practice, is available at https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0099 and will be published in the April issue of Pediatrics.

As many as 3% of U.S. children live in kinship care arrangements.

Because placement with a kinship caregiver often is sudden and unplanned, caregivers frequently are unprepared to meet the needs of the children and are unaware of available supports. Furthermore, caregivers may not have legal authority to advocate or make decisions for a child, complicating health care and educational decisions. Caregivers frequently have their own financial and health burdens, and often are asked to care for sibling groups, multiplying the stresses.

Pediatricians can help by recognizing these families in the office setting and addressing their needs.

Among the recommendations in the policy are the following:

  • Children may need more frequent visits to address mental health, developmental and educational needs, similar to children in traditional nonrelative foster care. These needs are more common and often more complicated than for children who live with their biologic parents.
  • Families may need information about supports and help accessing legal, health insurance and financial assistance programs.
  • Consent and confidentiality roles may need to be specifically defined.

The policy statement provides information to help pediatricians learn more about resources available in their own states and communities, and how to connect families to those resources.

Advocacy opportunities also are reviewed in the policy, such as working with policymakers and others to eliminate barriers so children can be placed with kin, when appropriate, and ensuring funding to support provision of care and health and social services.

The pediatrician’s role in meeting the health needs of children in kinship care is especially important because most of the families are not connected to child welfare or other formal services.

Dr. Springer, a lead author of the policy, is a member and former chair of the AAP Council on Foster Care, Adoption and Kinship Care. She also chaired the former Task Force on Foster Care.

Toolkit to Support Child Welfare Agencies in Serving LGBTQ Children, Youth, and Families

As the culture and laws related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals have become more inclusive in recent years, an increasing number of LGBTQ people are self-disclosing their sexual orientation and/or gender identity (i.e., “coming out”) during childhood or adolescence. Additionally, the number of LGBTQ individuals coming forward to serve as temporary or permanent caregivers to children and youth in foster care has increased.

This toolkit is designed to help States and territories adapt their policies and practices to meet the growing needs of LGBTQ children, youth, and families. It provides links to knowledge and skill building resources, including articles, videos, tools, training curricula, tip sheets, information briefs, websites, and other products. Resources are divided into the five categories. 

Access the website with resources, click here.

Published in Best Practices
CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REVIEWS: How Judges, Court Administrators and Attorneys Should Be Involved 
 
The Children’s Bureau within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families conducts Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSRs) in all States periodically to ensure conformity with Federal child welfare requirements, to gauge the experiences of children, youth, and families receiving State child welfare services, and to assist States in helping children families achieve positive outcomes.
 
The first two rounds of the CFSR were completed in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia between 2001 and 2010, and the third round will take place between 2015 and 2018. www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/monitoring/child-family-services-reviews/round3
 
This paper provides:
•An introduction to CFSRs,
•An explanation of why CFSRs are important to maintaining the momentum of court improvement efforts, and
•Specific suggestions for how courts can become involved in CFSRs.

Click to read the full document.

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