Child Welfare Information Gateway 

This publication examines State laws and policies regarding the development and implementation of plans of safe care that are required by the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to ensure the safety and well-being of infants who are identified as being affected by prenatal substance use. The issues addressed include notification/reporting requirements; assessment of the infant and family; development of the plan of safe care; services for the infant, parents, or other caregivers; and monitoring plans of safe care. CLICK HERE

The attached article is an excellent summary of concerns about Child Abuse Pediatric practice with some strong and well-grounded recommendations for improvements in practice (including recommendations that are consistent with Diane Redleaf's book <https://www.abc-clio.com/ABC-CLIOCorporate/product.aspx?pc=A5865C>and the report on Medical Ethics Concerns in Physical Child Abuse Investigations <https://www.familydefensecenter.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Medical-Ethics-Concerns-in-Physical-Child-Abuse-Investigations-corrected-reposted.pdf>.

It was written by Andrew Brown who co-chairs United Family Advocates and Diane Redleaf and leads child and family advocacy at Texas Public Policy Foundation.

Andrew has been involved in legislative reform efforts in this area and in child welfare generally in Texas and it is exciting to see this area of our work starting to get some significant attention.

Diane Redleaf

 

Author, *They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families At Risk (ABC-Clio (Praeger, October 2018);*

 

Founder, Executive Director, Legal Director, Family Defense Center, Chicago IL(2005-2017);

 

Principal, Family Defense Consulting: providing consultation to attorneys and advocates in the child  welfare system, expert witness services, individual advice and referrals to families, and public speaking and writing on topics related to family rights and issues in the child welfare system;

 

Co-chair, United Family Advocates (national policy advocacy coalition);

 

Award-winning non-profit leader.

Published in Parents' Attorneys
Tuesday, 22 January 2019 16:42

Preventing Child Neglect Training Series

Developed by CANTASD and the National Alliance of Children's Trust and Prevention Funds, the Preventing Child Neglect training series raises public awareness and understanding of child maltreatment, its causes, protective factors that help shield children and families, and manageable steps that each of us can take to help reduce the likelihood of child neglect. The training videos build upon each other and are designed to be viewed in sequential order. Each training video comes with a robust discussion toolkit that includes learning objectives, guidance for individual or group learning, a reflection journal, and links to additional resources.

 

Trainings

Training 1: Explore the Basics
The first training lays the foundation for the series by providing an overview of child neglect, types of neglect, and factors that influence how we take care of our children. 
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Training 2: Fact or Fiction? 
Training 2 shares key facts about child neglect and considers why some common assumptions may need closer examination.
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Training 3: Everyone’s Responsibility
Training 3 explores how protective factors can shield individuals and families from the risk factors of neglect.
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Training 4: What We All Can Do
Training 4 provides manageable steps and strategies at each level of the social ecological model to reduce the likelihood of child neglect. One person can make a difference. 
Learn More
 
The National Child Abuse and Neglect Technical Assistance and Strategic Dissemination Center (CANTASD) is a service of the Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse & Neglect, Administration for Children and FamiliesU.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
 
Published in Children's Justice Act

Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Get Strategies to Improve Health, Well-Being, and Opportunities for Children and Adults

CDC invites you to explore Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences, a new online training to help understand, recognize, and prevent ACEs.

ACEs affect children and families across all communities. They can have long-term effects on health, wellness, and life opportunities for adults. The good news is ACEs are preventable.

Develop knowledge and insights to prevent ACEs. Training topics include:

  • Adverse Childhood Experiences, Brain Development, and Toxic Stress
  • The ACE Study
  • Prevalence and Consequences of ACEs
  • Risk and Protective Factors for ACEs
  • Essentials for Childhood: Assuring Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships and Environments

Learn more about how to create healthier lives for all children in this accredited training. Continuing Education Units are available.

 

Learn More

Published in Children's Justice Act
Saturday, 11 August 2018 19:54

2018 Prevention Resource Guide

The 2018 Prevention Resource Guide, compiled by the Children's Bureau, has many resources, handouts to copy and share and is in both English and Spanish. 

Published in Children's Justice Act

How victims of child maltreatment fare in school

Thomas B. Fordham Institute - April 18, 2018

Although there is much research about "achievement gaps" between wealthy and poor students and the effects of "toxic stress" on academic outcomes, a recent study sought to examine the depth at which such issues as homelessness, domestic violence, neglect, and abuse can affect students in school, as well as the prevalence of the problem across schools and demographic groups.

Report: https://www.brookings.edu/research/how-life-outside-of-a-school-affects-student-performance-in-school/

https://edexcellence.net/articles/how-victims-of-child-maltreatment-fare-in-school

Published in Children's Justice Act

New data: child abuse deaths rise, notably in Texas, Indiana

Associated Press - February 02, 2018

According to a report released this week by the Department of Health and Human Services, there were 1,700 fatalities resulting from child maltreatment reported in fiscal year 2016, compared to 1,589 the previous year - a 7 percent increase. The figures encompass data from every state but Maine, as well as from the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Report: Child Maltreatment 2016: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/child-maltreatment-2016

Also: Federal Report: Child Maltreatment Numbers Down, Child Deaths Up: https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-welfare-2/federal-report-child-maltreatment-numbers-down-child-deaths-up

Also: United States: Report Reveals Sharp Increase in Child Abuse Deaths: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/United-States-Report-Reveals-Sharp-Increase-in-Child-Abuse-Deaths-20180203-0008.html

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/new-data-child-abuse-deaths-rise-notably-in-texas-indiana/article_4eb78a2d-c7d7-5bf7-914c-7720064c3461.html

Published in Data & Technology

Practice and Policy Considerations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical, and Service Providers

This guidance publication is intended to support the efforts of states, tribes, and local communities in addressing the needs of pregnant women with opioid use disorders and their infants and families.1 National data show that from 2000 to 2009 the use of opioids during pregnancy increased from 1.19 to 5.63 per 1,000 hospital births (Patrick, Schumacher, Benneyworth, Krans, McAllister, & Davis, 2012). Because of the high rate of opioid use and misuse among all women, including pregnant women, medical, social service, and judicial agencies are having to confront this concern more often and, in some communities, at alarming rates.

Read the full report: Link to Report

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Administration for Children and Families Administration on Children, Youth and Families Children’s Bureau

The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect.
Kahn, Nicholas. Gupta-Kagan, Josh. Hansen, Mary.
2017
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies
14(2)p. 333-369
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2818533

 

The Standard of Proof in the Substantiation of Child Abuse and Neglect by Nicholas Kahn, Josh Gupta-Kagan, Mary Eschelbach Hansen :: SSRN

Abstract

We measure the extent to which requiring a high standard of proof for substantiation of child abuse or neglect by child protection agencies actually influences the disposition of a report of abuse or neglect. Using data on nearly 8 million reports from fiscal 2000-2012, we show that a high standard is associated with lower rates of substantiation and that an increase in the standard decreases the probability of substantiation by up to 14 percent. After a change to a high standard, children may be less likely to be placed in foster care, and children and families are more likely to receive other types of services. Increases in the standard seem to be driven by perceptions of the costs of type 1 error – that is, substantiating a report when no abuse occurred. Indeed, states’ decisions to increase the standard are strongly correlated with fatalities in foster care and the size of the foster care system, suggesting that public concern about type 1 error leading to overly-invasive child protection agency action can spur a shift in the standard of proof.

 

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