Monitoring and evaluation are essential activities for making informed decisions and guiding improvements. This brief can help child welfare agency leaders, managers, and teams partner with evaluators and data analysts to monitor and evaluate the implementation and impact of a program or other intervention and apply findings over the course of the change and implementation process. 
Brief 

Capacity Building Center for States. 2019 https://go.usa.gov/xVYjS

Published in CIP Administration

The nature of conflict has changed, putting children in the frontline in new and terrible ways. Wars are lasting longer. They are more likely to be fought in urban areas amongst civilian populations leading to deaths and life-changing injuries, and laying waste to the infrastructure needed to guarantee access to food and water. Attacks on schools and hospitals are up. The denial of humanitarian aid is used as yet another weapon of war. The international rules and basic standards of conduct that exist to protect civilians in conflict are being flouted with impunity. 

Graham, George. Kirollos, Martam. Fylkesnes, Gunvor Knag. Salarkia, Keyan. Wong, Nikki. Save the Children.

2019 https://www.savethechildren.org/content/dam/usa/reports/ed-cp/stop-the-war-on-children-2019.pdf

Published in Children's Justice Act

Around the world, 4 million refugee children are out of school and missing out on their right to an education due to displacement, poverty and exclusion.1 For the refugee children who have found a way back to the classroom, it is likely they are not receiving an education that supports them to recover from their experiences or ensures they are learning. 

Save the Children. 2018 https://www.savethechildren.org/content/dam/usa/reports/ed-cp/hear-it-from-the-teachers-refugee-education-report.pdf

Homeless youth experience elevated risks for a variety of maladaptive social, health, 
and legal outcomes. Among these are higher rates of physical and sexual victimization, drug use 
exposure, mental health need, and justice-system contact. More than 75% of homeless youth 
will have contact with police, with more than 50% experiencing arrest. Because of the high 
proportion of homeless youth who experience justice-system contact, there is currently 
significant interest in developing policies and programs to minimize this contact while providing 
youth with the necessary supports and services to remain housed. 

Walker, Sarah Cusworth. Valencia, Esteban. Vick, Kristin. 2018 Sponsoring Organization: Raikes Foundation.

Block-Leavitt Foundation. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5935ee95893fc011586f1304/t/5c38e34db8a0453f8c57dc8a/1547232079123/Report+of+a+Research+to+Practice+Partnership+to+De

The American Academy of Pediatrics is committed to addressing the factors that affect child and adolescent health with a focus on issues that may leave some children more vulnerable than others. Racism is a social determinant of health that has a profound impact on the health status of children, adolescents, emerging adults, and their families. Although progress has been made toward racial equality and equity, the evidence to support the continued negative impact of racism on health and well-being through implicit and explicit biases, institutional structures, and interpersonal relationships is clear. The objective of this policy statement is to provide an evidence-based document focused on the role of racism in child and adolescent development and health outcomes. 

Trent, Maria. Dooley, Danielle G. Douge, Jacqueline. American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Adolescent Health, Council on Community Pediatrics, Committee on Adolescence. 2019 Pediatrics 144(2)16 p. https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/144/2/e20191765 https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/144/2/e20191765.full.pdf

Published in General

Blog post written by Jerry MIlner, Acting Commissioner of the Children's Bureau, on what he has learned from listening to families involved with the child welfare system.

Rethinking Foster Care <https://rethinkingfostercare.blogspot.com/>

------------------------------

Hope

<http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RethinkingFosterCare/~3/841sRlcZFAc/hope.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email>

 

Posted: 20 Aug 2019 09:37 AM PDT

 

*Hope*

 

A few days ago, I walked into a room full of young adults who had spent time in our foster care system, including some who had emancipated after many years. Entering a room full of folks who have experienced our foster care system personally is a familiar situation for me, and it’s one of the greatest privileges and joys of my job.  I meet and speak with as many young people and parents with lived experience as possible.  In fact, this group was the second group of young people I had meet with that day.

 

In looking around the room, I realized that I knew nearly all of the young people in the room*.  I mean I* *really knew them - *Kayla, Joshua, Diego, David, Leroy, Scout, Lupe, Eric-lee and so many others.  I had met these people on multiple occasions. We had been in meetings together, attended the same events, and had lots of conversation.  I had heard their stories, been in photos together, and befriended many on social media (the only reason I stay on social media).  I even mentor one of these young people as best I can although, truth be told, he should be mentoring me.

 

I was struck by the reality that in two short years, these incredible young people have become an indispensable part of my world.  Their experiences and wisdom are now integrated into my experience and wisdom - an unexpected gift.

 

As always, the staff of the organization or agency holding the meetings I attend thanked me profusely for making the time to attend, to listen to the young people, to make them a priority in my busy schedule, and so on.

 

When this happens I always smile politely and say what a pleasure it is, but the response swirling in my head is, *really*?  You’re *really *thanking me for doing this?

 

If listening to and making an effort to understand the voices of those we purport to serve are not our priorities, what should our priorities be?

 

If we do not make time to meet with them and give them the respect of a system that has alternately aided and failed them, what should we make time for?

 

If we do not use the wisdom and words that people with lived experience share with us to guide our decisions and polices, then what should guide them?

 

In early August, the Children’s Bureau issued Information Memorandum 19-03 that calls on the field to solicit and use the voices of parents and youth who have experienced the child welfare system first-hand.  We provided specific recommendations on how it can be done and why we believe it is foundational to our work.

 

It will not happen unless we consciously cede space for it to happen and commit every day to ensure their voices are sought out and heard.

 

It may not always be easy or comfortable to give up our thinking that *we know best* and to share decision-making with those whose lives are so deeply affected by our work.

 

It may not comport with our crisis-driven work days to step back and listen.

 

But the value that their voices bring to our programs and services and, ultimately on the outcomes they experience, outweighs the effort and discomfort.

 

A couple of days after that meeting, I walked into another room - this time in Nashville, Tennessee. I was there for another meeting to co-present with a parent with lived experience (who I also feel I know quite well) and a young woman with lived foster care experience (who I look forward to becoming better acquainted with).  My colleague, David Kelly, moderated the panel.  Midway through the session, he asked the three of us a very simple question - *what gives you hope for the future of our child welfare system?*

 

My response was simple.

 

The advocacy and strength of the young adults I met with a few days ago give me hope.

 

Shrounda and Christina, the two remarkable women seated to my left, give me hope.

 

Sharing the stage with *them*rather than other bureaucrats like myself gives me hope.

 

Knowing that their resilience and tenacity were stronger than the difficulties they faced gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they and others like them have answers to our hardest questions gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they are leaders in reshaping child welfare in our country gives me hope.

 

*Hope* *is a powerful thing*.


ABA Journal - August 13, 2019
Resolution 115C, declaring that the Indian Child Welfare Act is constitutional, was easily approved by the ABA House of Delegates on Tuesday. The Indian Child Welfare Act was passed in 1978 to address the fact that states remove Indian children from their parents at high rates. Because those children were not often placed with members of their own tribes, that high rate was hurting tribes' ability to pass on their cultures to the next generation.

Also: Editorial: ICWA ruling a victory for tribes: https://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-icwa-ruling-a-victory-for-tribes/article_d70b9f12-6d72-5de7-a80b-3064a3f7ea6c.html

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/the-indian-child-welfare-resolution-115C

 

WNYC - August 14, 2019
The one-year filing period is known as a "look-back window," and allows victims to bring cases that used to be beyond the state's statute of limitations that legislators overhauled this year. Manhattan Assemblymember Yuh-line Niou is one of the people who voted for the new law, touting it at a news conference on Tuesday.

Also: Lawyers for victims of childhood abuse predict gut-wrenching stories in court (Includes video): https://www.whec.com/news/lawyers-for-victims-of-childhood-abuse-predict-gut-wrenching-stories-in-court/5456407/?cat=565
Also: Hundreds of child sex abuse victims to file civil suits (Includes video): https://wnyt.com/news/hundreds-of-child-sex-abuse-victims-to-file-civil-suits/5456200/?cat=10114
Also: Hundreds of lawsuits expected in New York after statute lifted on old child abuse cases: https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/457361-hundreds-of-lawsuits-expected-in-new-york-after-statute-lifted-on-old

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/14/750881986/adult-victims-of-childhood-sex-abuse-in-new-york-can-sue-alleged-abusers

 

Policy makers, practitioners, and researchers have emphasized the importance of supportive relationships between staff and parents in early childhood education settings and schools.
Author(s): Barnes, Carolyn.;Nolan, Sarah.
Published: 2019
Journal Name: Children and Youth Services Review
v. 98, March 2019, p. 238-251
Available from: Elsevier
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740918305589

Published in Best Practices

Awareness about the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) in the United States has increased during the last ten years. The increased awareness is reflected ...
Author(s): Hounmenou, Charles.;O'Grady, Caitlin.
Published: 2019
Journal Name: Children and Youth Services Review
v. 98, March 2019, p. 188-198 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740918306583

Published in Families
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