Conflicts are an inevitable part of any workplace and a constant source of stress for many leaders. Conflict resolution is an important skill for any leader to master.

Like many other challenges, conflicts can actually present opportunities for positive change. Effective conflict resolution can build deeper relationships and foster more effective communication.Lolly Daskal.com CLICK HERE

Turnover rates, burnout, vicarious trauma, and professional development needs of the workforce are specific challenges often faced by child welfare administrators. The relationship between the supervisor and the frontline worker is important to increasing staff retention, debriefing stress, and enhancing staff development. The strengths-based supervision (SBS) model enhances the intentionality and quality of supervision provided by child welfare professionals. The Journal of Contemporary Social Services CLICK HERE

The Global status report on preventing violence against children 2020 charts countries’ progress towards the SDGs aimed at ending violence against children. Jointly published by WHO, UNICEF, UNESCO, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative on Violence against Children, and the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children, it collates inputs from over 1000 decision-makers in 155 countries who assessed their violence prevention status against the evidence-based approaches set out in INSPIRE: Seven strategies for ending violence against children. The report shows that while many of the participating countries are taking some action, government officials from these same countries acknowledge that their efforts are clearly insufficient to achieve the SDG targets. The report concludes with recommendations for boosting INSPIRE implementation efforts and accelerating national progress. World Health Organization CLICK HERE

Child Protection: Law Enforcement
The safety and well-being of children are central to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP’s) mission. OJJDP enhances the efforts of federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies who investigate cases of missing, abducted, and exploited children; ensure
that victims receive trauma-informed care; and bring offenders to justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention CLICK HERE

Wednesday, 30 September 2020 09:16

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children© (NCMEC), serves as an information clearinghouse and national resource center on issues related to victims, missing and exploited children and operates a national toll-free hotline. Office of Juvenile and Delinquenct Prevention. 

CLICK HERE

Click the attachment to read the Executive Order issued on June 24, 2020 concerning the Child Welfare System.

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This resource provides thoughts and guidelines for talking about these complex issues of racism and equality in age-appropriate ways with children aged two to five years of age. These are difficult and uncomfortable discussions for which there is no recipe. You will know how to adapt these ideas in a way that reflects your unique situation and the individual needs of your child. You might also find it helpful to seek input from your family and trusted sources like religious and other community leaders. Click to access the resource guide.

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ABA Journal - August 13, 2019
Resolution 115C, declaring that the Indian Child Welfare Act is constitutional, was easily approved by the ABA House of Delegates on Tuesday. The Indian Child Welfare Act was passed in 1978 to address the fact that states remove Indian children from their parents at high rates. Because those children were not often placed with members of their own tribes, that high rate was hurting tribes' ability to pass on their cultures to the next generation.

Also: Editorial: ICWA ruling a victory for tribes: https://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-icwa-ruling-a-victory-for-tribes/article_d70b9f12-6d72-5de7-a80b-3064a3f7ea6c.html

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/the-indian-child-welfare-resolution-115C

 

WNYC - August 14, 2019
The one-year filing period is known as a "look-back window," and allows victims to bring cases that used to be beyond the state's statute of limitations that legislators overhauled this year. Manhattan Assemblymember Yuh-line Niou is one of the people who voted for the new law, touting it at a news conference on Tuesday.

Also: Lawyers for victims of childhood abuse predict gut-wrenching stories in court (Includes video): https://www.whec.com/news/lawyers-for-victims-of-childhood-abuse-predict-gut-wrenching-stories-in-court/5456407/?cat=565
Also: Hundreds of child sex abuse victims to file civil suits (Includes video): https://wnyt.com/news/hundreds-of-child-sex-abuse-victims-to-file-civil-suits/5456200/?cat=10114
Also: Hundreds of lawsuits expected in New York after statute lifted on old child abuse cases: https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/457361-hundreds-of-lawsuits-expected-in-new-york-after-statute-lifted-on-old

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/14/750881986/adult-victims-of-childhood-sex-abuse-in-new-york-can-sue-alleged-abusers

 

Introduction

The relationship with a parent or primary caregiver is critical to a child’s sense of self, safety, and trust. However, many children experience the loss of a caregiver, either permanently due to death, or for varying amounts of time due to other circumstances. Children may develop posttraumatic responses when separated from their caregiver. The following provides information and suggestions for helping children who experience traumatic separation from a caregiver.

Access the full fact sheet

Children with Traumatic Separation: Information for Professionals

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

www.NCTSN.org

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