First Book and ImpactED - September 23, 2019
The most common barriers to learning faced by kids in need have nothing to do with what goes on at school, according to survey results released today by First Book and ImpactED at the University of Pennsylvania. The majority of those surveyed - 3,000 educators exclusively serving low-income communities - reported that a lack of family engagement, inadequate access to behavioral health support, and the impact of trauma are the most significant obstacles preventing kids from learning. These barriers, all issues related to the toxic stress of poverty1, must first be addressed before a child can learn, according to the educators.
Also: First Book Education Barriers Survey: https://firstbook.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/First-Book-Barriers-Survey-2019-F.pdf

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-data-from-first-book-identifies-the-most-important-school-supply-for-kids-in-need-support-for-toxic-stress-of-poverty-300923410.html

 

Around the world, 4 million refugee children are out of school and missing out on their right to an education due to displacement, poverty and exclusion.1 For the refugee children who have found a way back to the classroom, it is likely they are not receiving an education that supports them to recover from their experiences or ensures they are learning. 

Save the Children. 2018 https://www.savethechildren.org/content/dam/usa/reports/ed-cp/hear-it-from-the-teachers-refugee-education-report.pdf

Residential mobility is modestly related to academic readiness for low-income children. Moving may be an important marker for children at-risk for academic difficulties. Moving is modestly indirectly related to academic skills in elementary school.

Schmitt, Sara A. Lipscomb, Shannon T.
2016
Early Childhood Research Quarterly
36(3rd Quarte)p. 190-200
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885200616300023

How victims of child maltreatment fare in school

Thomas B. Fordham Institute - April 18, 2018

Although there is much research about "achievement gaps" between wealthy and poor students and the effects of "toxic stress" on academic outcomes, a recent study sought to examine the depth at which such issues as homelessness, domestic violence, neglect, and abuse can affect students in school, as well as the prevalence of the problem across schools and demographic groups.

Report: https://www.brookings.edu/research/how-life-outside-of-a-school-affects-student-performance-in-school/

https://edexcellence.net/articles/how-victims-of-child-maltreatment-fare-in-school

Published in Children's Justice Act

Every time foster kids move, they lose months of academic progress

Milwaukee Times - April 26, 2018

When 12-year-old Jimmy Wayne's parents dropped him off at a motel and drove away, he became the newest member of the North Carolina Foster Care system. Over the next two years in the foster care system, he attended 12 different schools. "I don't even remember what I learned-no, let me rephrase that-I don't remember what they tried to teach me-after fifth grade," he said recently.

Information Gateway resource: Meeting Educational Needs of Children & Youth in Out-of-Home Care: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/service-array/education-services/meeting-needs/

Published in Children's Justice Act

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education is pleased to release the latest edition of the Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.

This publication provides a review of data and research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other key stakeholders. These four sections are:

1) A brief data at a glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care;

2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting;

3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care, with accompanying citations; and

4) An overview of some promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care. 

This national factsheet reflects a shift in policy and practice around the country over the past decade. The first edition, released in 2006, included a limited, but consistent, group of research studies, all depicting the poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. The 2006 national factsheet raised awareness about the critical importance of prioritizing education for students in foster care. For more than a decade, through the leadership of the National Working Group on Foster Care and Education (National Working Group), with support from various foundations including Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Stuart Foundation, several revised editions of this factsheet have been released, including this 2018 version.

We now have a growing body of research that reflects the educational needs of this group of students, most of which still indicates that students in foster care face significant educational challenges. Fortunately, we also have a growing number of federal and state laws that provide rights and protections for students in foster care, and many promising programs and interventions designed to address a wide range of factors influencing the disparities in education outcomes. With cross-system collaboration and the implementation of improved federal and state policies, we are positioned to build on what is being learned, bring about change, and promote success for all children and youth in foster care. We are grateful to the National Work Group members who have provided information to make this resource a valuable compilation of data, research, and promising interventions. This publication was compiled by the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a project of the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, in partnership with the Education Law Center and Juvenile Law Center.

We encourage you to share this resource with your networks.

Sneha Barve

Staff Attorney, Center on Children and the Law American Bar Association

1050 Connecticut Ave.

Suite 400

Washington, DC 20036

 

T:  202.442.3344

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The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education (http://www.fostercareandeducation.org) would like to share important news regarding the issuance of final federal regulations by the U.S. Department of Education implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This link will guide you to the regulations released on November 28, 2016: http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/essaaccountstplans1129.pdf.

There are several key provisions in these regulations important to children in foster care, but the language addressing transportation is most timely given impending deadlines.  The regulations clarify the obligation of education and child welfare agencies to provide transportation during disputes over payment of any "additional costs" of transportation to maintain children's school stability.  Specifically, the regulations reinforce the responsibility of the State Education Agencies (SEAs) to:

  • Ensure that children in foster care promptly receive transportation, as necessary, to and from their schools of origin when in the children's best interest.
  • Ensure that LEAs that receive funding under Title I collaborate with child welfare agencies to develop and implement clear written transportation procedures that describe how school stability will be ensured in the event of a dispute over which agency or agencies will pay for any additional costs incurred.
  • Ensure that LEAs' local transportation procedures describe which agency or agencies will initially pay the additional costs so that transportation is provided to children in foster care during the pendency of any funding disputes.

These regulations send a clear message that providing transportation to achieve school stability for children in foster care is of paramount importance and that SEAs as well as LEAs, in collaboration with local child welfare agencies, have a clear duty to ensure that transportation is promptly provided.  Neither ESSA nor this regulation specifically allocate the responsibility to fund additional costs to either LEAs or local child welfare agencies.  Rather, this new regulation clarifies that state and local educational agencies have bottom line responsibility for developing and implementing procedures that guarantee school stability transportation for all children in foster care when disputes arise - and during the pendency of disputes - over which agency or agencies will fund any additional costs incurred.

These regulations go into effect January 30, 2017. However, it is important to remember that the provisions in ESSA relating to school stability, prompt school enrollment, and transportation to ensure school stability for children in foster care go into effect on December 10, 2016. State and local child welfare and education agencies must immediately begin or continue conversations about their shared responsibility to support the school stability and the success of students in foster care.  In order to ensure consistency across all districts within a state, the U.S. Department of Education has encouraged SEAs to issue uniform statewide guidance on how disputes should be resolved regarding which agency or agencies will fund transportation (including funding for transportation pending those disputes) and to establish a common dispute resolution process at the state level.

We look forward to continuing to support this work in your state, and encourage you to please contact us with questions or updates.

Kristin Kelly, Esq.

American Bar Association

Center on Children and the Law

1050 Connecticut Avenue NW, 4th Floor

Washington, DC 20036

(202) 662-1733

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This policy report provides an overview of the challenges foster youth confront when pursuing a postsecondary credential, focuses on the treatment of these youth by state financial aid programs, and offers potential remedies that state policy leaders may pursue to increase successful outcomes for this population.

AUTHOR(S): Brian A. Sponsler, Emily Parker, Molly Sarubbi

Sponsored by: Education Commission of the States

Download the Report

Published in Children's Justice Act