America's Christian Credit Union - August 13, 2019
America's Christian Credit Union (ACCU), a faith-based financial institution headquartered in Glendora, CA, recently conducted a financial literacy workshop serving foster youth at Pasadena City College (PCC). In keeping with one of its key corporate priorities of building stronger futures, ACCU provided the students with basic financial knowledge. https://www.cuinsight.com/press-release/accu-partners-with-community-college-to-teach-financial-literacy-serving-foster-youth

Held at PCC’s Foothill campus, the sessions covered topics such as balancing a checkbook, building a good credit score, setting financial goals, and budgeting. A dozen ACCU staff members volunteered their time on three consecutive Saturdays—July 13, 20, and 27.
Workshop presenter Rachel, an Accounting staff at ACCU, had personal reasons for her involvement. Having made financial mistakes in the past, Rachel felt she had something to contribute based on her own experience. She was also inspired by her mother, who had grown up in foster care. “When I told my mom what we were doing, she was really excited about it,” recalls Rachel. “She said that as a foster kid you don’t feel like you belong to yourself, and it’s great that ACCU can come alongside and help these young people.”

After more than a decade of declines in the foster care caseload in the United States, cases have risen steadily since 2012.1 Between 2012 and 2017, the number of children living in foster care and entering care increased by 12% and 8%, respectively.1 One proposed explanation for this recent growth is the opioid epidemic, but supporting evidence is scarce.2,3 In this exploratory study, we examine trends in the number of children entering foster care because of parental drug use and describe changes in their characteristics over time.
Research Letter.
Meinhofer, Angélica. Angleró-Díaz, Yohanis.
2019
JAMA Pediatrics - Prepublication
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2737904

This report turns the lens on young people who age out of foster care and explores four areas — education, early parenthood, homelessness and incarceration — where they fare worse than their general population peers. Readers will learn the economic cost of this shortfall and see how targeted interventions can help these youth while also erasing billions of dollars in unnecessary costs.

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative (Annie E. Casey Foundation)
2019
https://www.aecf.org/resources/future-savings/
https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-futuresavings-2019.pdf

 

New Foster Parents Gain Experience with Incremental Challenges

Policy & Practice - April 01, 2019

The new foster parents are ready for their first foster children. Seemingly, there should be no hesitation. But are these brand new foster parents really ready for any foster child? From a social work and legal perspective, would it be acceptable to put a young sibling group into a foster home if the parents have little or no parenting experience? There is a giant learning curve from licensed foster parent to successful foster parent and it is the obligation of the licensor and case managers to ensure that new foster parents are not overloaded beyond their capabilities.

http://yeshiva.imodules.com/s/1739/images/gid10/editor_documents/new_foster_parents_gain_experience_with_incremental_challenges.pdf?sessionid=c0111e53-2cd9-4e52-952f-371237a9b6c1&cc=1

 

Youth Today - April 22, 2019

Youth homelessness is a pervasive problem throughout the United States, and its rate has steadily risen over the years. According to the Center for American Progress, youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) are disproportionately affected by homelessness compared to their percentage in the overall population.

https://youthtoday.org/2019/04/homeless-lgbt-youth-how-we-can-fight-their-invisibility-including-youth-of-color/

Brookings - April 24, 2019

The number of children in foster care has risen for the fifth consecutive year, reaching nearly 443,000 children in 2017, in part due to child welfare agencies' response to the rising incidence of parents' opioid addiction. Given this increase in caseload, coupled with the fact that between 30 to 50 percent of foster families step down each year, there is a growing need to prioritize effective recruitment and retention for foster parents, including relative (or kinship) foster parents.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2019/04/24/keeping-up-with-the-caseload-how-to-recruit-and-retain-foster-parents/

Published in Children's Justice Act

Child Trends Introduces New Tool in Comparable Child Welfare Data

Chronicle of Social Change - March 08, 2019

Child Trends has released a new tool that offers browsers a robust collection of data around child maltreatment, foster care, kinship caregivers and adoption for all 50 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. The figures are drawn from the most recent Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) report, the U.S. Census Bureau and other sources. All the information is pegged to national trendlines for comparison purposes.

Tool: State-level data for understanding child welfare in the United States: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/state-level-data-for-understanding-child-welfare-in-the-united-states

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-welfare-2/brand-new-tool-in-comparable-child-welfare-data/34137

Published in Data & Technology
Tuesday, 12 March 2019 14:03

ABOUT CAPTA - A Legislative History

About CAPTA: A Legislative History
The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), the key federal legislation addressing child abuse and neglect, was most recently amended in 2018. Read a summary on its legislative history.

Published in Children's Justice Act

This report turns the lens on young people who age out of foster care and explores four areas — education, early parenthood, homelessness and incarceration — where they fare worse than their general population peers. Readers will learn the economic cost of this shortfall and see how targeted interventions can help these youth while also erasing billions of dollars in unnecessary costs.

Read this new report from Annie E. Casey Foundation - click here.

Released January 2019

Advocate - February 16, 2019

They first came to the Legislature as part of a fledgling internship program through the nonprofit Louisiana Institute for Children in Families. But they are expected to be key players this session, as the Legislature debates extending foster care beyond age 18.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/article_cd6e7cb4-3185-11e9-84d3-073002927bd6.html

Published in Children's Justice Act
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