Addressing Trauma May Be the Key to Helping Foster Youth Succeed in the Workplace

Chronicle of Social Change - October 05, 2018

Internships can often serve as an important leg up for young people trying to gain work experience and build relationships with employers. But few foster youth participate in such opportunities. A recent study of California foster youth at age 21 found that only 30 percent had completed an internship, apprenticeship or other on-the-job training in the past year.

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-trauma-2/addressing-trauma-may-be-the-key-to-helping-foster-youth-succeed-in-the-workplace/32331

Published in Children's Justice Act

Title: State Practices in Treatment/Therapeutic Foster Care. 
Author(s): Seibert, Julie.;Feinberg, Rose.;Ayub, Asha.;Helburn, Amy.;Gibbs, Deborah. 
Published: 2018 
Available from: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) 
http://aspe.hhs.gov/ 
Room 415F 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
200 Independence Av, SW 
Washington, DC 20201 

Printable version (PDF): https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/259121/TREATMENTFOSTERCARE.pdf

Abstract: This federally funded report presents findings from an investigation into how therapeutic foster care (TFC) is implemented and supported by States. Information for the report comes from key informant interviews, representing a variety of perspectives on TFC, and a review of relevant literature. The report provides an overview of the key program elements of TFC defined by States and how States differentiate TFC from foster care. The report also provides a description of how States provide adjunct services, such as case management and behavioral health services to children in TFC. Finally, the report includes information on the different funding strategies employed by States to support TFC services. Findings indicate key elements of TFC include highly skilled caregivers (TFC parents) who are part of the child’s treatment team, enhanced case management, and coordinated delivery of behavioral health and other community-based services. The study also found that although TFC may be a cost-effective alternative to residential care, funding challenges limit its use in many States. States typically fund TFC using Medicaid funds for clinical and therapeutic services and Title IV-E funds for daily care of eligible children. TFC may also be supported with funds from state child welfare, juvenile justice and behavioral health agencies, and provider agency fundraising. Finally, the study found States have employed a variety of strategies to increase Medicaid funding for TFC, such as defining TFC as a service in the state Medicaid plan, categorizing TFC as a rehabilitative service, and using waivers authorized by Section 1115 and Titles 1915(b) and (c) of the Social Security Act. The report concludes TFC is successfully utilized by several States as an alternative to congregate care. Appendices include State profiles. 6 references. 

Children Placed in Foster Care Because of Substance Use Now More Likely to Go to Relatives than Non-relatives, A Report Finds

The recently updated report from Generations United, Raising Children of the Opioid Epidemic: Solutions and Support for Grandfamilies, shows that -- overall -- foster care systems are relying more on grandparents and other relatives to care for children when their parents cannot. The report includes recommendations on how to connect grandfamilies to the same supports and services that traditional unrelated foster families receive. Read the release, then see the updated report

Medicaid Covers Foster Kids, But Daunting Health Needs Still Slip Through The Cracks

Kaiser Health News - August 24, 2018

Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor, picks up the tab for nearly all children in foster care and often continues to cover them if they are adopted, regardless of their parents' income. And as a result of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, foster children who have Medicaid at 18 can retain the coverage until they turn 26. Yet, Croom and other foster parents say that even with the coverage they struggle to meet the extraordinary health needs of their children. Part of the trouble is too few doctors accept Medicaid, most notably mental health specialists.

https://khn.org/news/medicaid-covers-foster-kids-but-daunting-health-needs-still-slip-through-the-cracks/

Published in Children's Justice Act

Louisiana family services agency takes first steps to expanding foster care eligibility to age 21Acadiana Advocate - August 22, 2018

Department of Children and Family Services officials got what they wanted this summer when Sen. Regina Barrow, D-Baton Rouge, passed a bill setting up a panel to study raising the age of foster care eligibility from 18 to 21. They were floored when Sen. Ryan Gatti, R-Bossier City, then successfully pushed a law mandating the change immediately, before the panel was even formed. Gatti's bill came "out of nowhere," said DCFS Secretary Marketa Walters, speaking Wednesday in an interview during breakout sessions at a community meeting in Lafayette.  Additional Resources: Information Gateway resource: Support Services for Youth in Transition: Life Skills. Read Article.  

Published in Home Page

On February 9, 2018, President Donald Trump signed into law the most significant reform to foster care since the federal government got into that business.

This fundamental re-ordering of the government’s role in child welfare extends far beyond the 437,000 children living in foster care today. A 2017 study found that one in three U.S. children will be investigated as victims of child maltreatment by the time they turn 18. That means millions of American children will have the experience of a child abuse investigator coming into their home, questioning whether or not their parents are fit to care for them. This is no niche concern.

Despite the sweeping implications, the debate since the Family First Prevention Services Act was passed has largely been confined to the narrow world of child welfare policy. But, the development portends something much larger: a historic moment in American governance. At a time of ballooning federal deficits and Congressional leaders’ calls for reining in costly “entitlement” programs like Medicaid and Social Security, Family First quietly but significantly expanded the scope of the federal child welfare entitlement, which currently supports only foster care placements and adoptions.

Read the full article: 

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/analysis/foster-care-and-americas-compact-vulnerable-people/31809

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care

Best Practices for States   
August 8, 2018  - Urban Institute

ABSTRACT: In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act gave states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have extended or are in the process of extending federally funded foster care with a safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate place to live. There are gaps in our knowledge of best practices for housing young adults in extended care, the housing options currently available to those young adults, and how those options vary across and within states. This brief begins to address these knowledge gaps by gathering information form a purposive sample of officials from public child welfare agencies in states that have extended federally funded foster care to age 21 and a group of stakeholders who attended a convening on the topic. The brief also highlights suggestions for future research.

https://www.urban.org/research/publication/housing-young-adults-extended-federally-funded-foster-care/view/full_report

https://www.urban.org/research/publication/housing-young-adults-extended-federally-funded-foster-care

Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth

This month (June) is Reunification Month—a good time to celebrate family and redouble our efforts to make it possible for more families to be supported in achieving permanency through reunification. As an organization that focuses on older youth, Juvenile Law Center is interested in supporting and expanding ways that safe and sustainable reunification can occur for older youth, including youth who are just entering or at risk of entering the foster care system and young people who have been in care for some period of time, even years. This is the right thing to do because we know achieving permanency will improve transition outcomes, but it is also urgent given the demographics of the child welfare system: in 2016, for example, 22% of youth who entered foster care were age 13 or older.   

Read the rest of the article - click here. 

Blog Post by: Jennifer Pokempner, Child Welfare Policy Director, Juvenile Law Center; Dominique Mikell, Stoneleigh Fellow, Juvenile Law Center; Jennifer Rodriguez, Executive Director, Youth Law Center,

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