This report turns the lens on young people who age out of foster care and explores four areas — education, early parenthood, homelessness and incarceration — where they fare worse than their general population peers. Readers will learn the economic cost of this shortfall and see how targeted interventions can help these youth while also erasing billions of dollars in unnecessary costs.

Read this new report from Annie E. Casey Foundation - click here.

Released January 2019

Advocate - February 16, 2019

They first came to the Legislature as part of a fledgling internship program through the nonprofit Louisiana Institute for Children in Families. But they are expected to be key players this session, as the Legislature debates extending foster care beyond age 18.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/article_cd6e7cb4-3185-11e9-84d3-073002927bd6.html

Published in Children's Justice Act
Friday, 30 November 2018 11:47

Welcoming All Families

Welcoming All Families
The Center for American Progress, in partnership with Voice for Adoption and the North American Council on Adoptable Children, released Welcoming All Families, which explores the impact of religious refusal laws in the child welfare system, tells stories of anti-LGBTQ discrimination against parents and youth in the child welfare system, and presents new data on the cost of keeping children in foster care. Share the report to help make the case for LGBTQ inclusion. While you’re at it, point colleagues to ACAF’s Beginner’s Guide for agencies looking for guidance on how to begin their LGBTQ inclusion efforts.

This information was gathered from the November 30th edition of All Children - All Families from Field Forward.

Published in LGBTQ Youth

A new study reveals what many people working in the foster care system have known for years - older children are falling behind their peers who have not experienced foster care. The Annie E. Casey Foundation collected data across all 50 states and found older children who've been in foster care are on track to face higher levels of joblessness and homelessness as adults. "Older" is defined as 14 and up. And, in Arizona's foster care system, that includes one in five kids.

Study: Fostering Youth Transitions: https://www.aecf.org/resources/fostering-youth-transitions/#summary

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

Addressing Trauma May Be the Key to Helping Foster Youth Succeed in the Workplace

Chronicle of Social Change - October 05, 2018

Internships can often serve as an important leg up for young people trying to gain work experience and build relationships with employers. But few foster youth participate in such opportunities. A recent study of California foster youth at age 21 found that only 30 percent had completed an internship, apprenticeship or other on-the-job training in the past year.

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-trauma-2/addressing-trauma-may-be-the-key-to-helping-foster-youth-succeed-in-the-workplace/32331

Published in Children's Justice Act

Children Placed in Foster Care Because of Substance Use Now More Likely to Go to Relatives than Non-relatives, A Report Finds

The recently updated report from Generations United, Raising Children of the Opioid Epidemic: Solutions and Support for Grandfamilies, shows that -- overall -- foster care systems are relying more on grandparents and other relatives to care for children when their parents cannot. The report includes recommendations on how to connect grandfamilies to the same supports and services that traditional unrelated foster families receive. Read the release, then see the updated report

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth
NCTSN RESOURCE 

Resource Description

Discusses the many transitions experienced by, and the challenges transitions pose for, young traumatized children in the child welfare system. Whether responding to the transition from the biological parents' home to a foster home, from foster home to foster home, or the changes accompanying reunification, those working in the child welfare system will benefit from understanding the effects of these transitions and the appropriate methods for facilitating them.

Published in 2012

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Every time foster kids move, they lose months of academic progress

Milwaukee Times - April 26, 2018

When 12-year-old Jimmy Wayne's parents dropped him off at a motel and drove away, he became the newest member of the North Carolina Foster Care system. Over the next two years in the foster care system, he attended 12 different schools. "I don't even remember what I learned-no, let me rephrase that-I don't remember what they tried to teach me-after fifth grade," he said recently.

Information Gateway resource: Meeting Educational Needs of Children & Youth in Out-of-Home Care: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/service-array/education-services/meeting-needs/

Published in Children's Justice Act
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