In This Report on Helping Low-Income Workers Succeed, You'll Learn
Who are the most vulnerable workers and why? 
How work and work requirements have changed over time. 
What today and tomorrow's workers need to succeed. 
What efforts are underway to help workers build skills, careers and greater economic stability. 

https://www.aecf.org/resources/taking-action/?utm_source=The+Annie+E.+Casey+Foundation&utm_campaign=9f1704f8ec-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_08_28_02_45&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_cbe3aa8104-9f1704f8ec-82848813

On December 17, 2018, CANTASD (the National Child Abuse and Neglect Technical Assistance and Strategic Dissemination Center) hosted a Digital Dialogue with Natalia Aguirre, National Director of the Family Justice Center Alliance at the Alliance for HOPE International; and Stacy Phillips, Program Manager for the Justice Department’s Office for Victims of Crime. This dialogue focused on polyvictimization—when a single individual has multiple experiences with violence or abuse. This document summarizes the key concepts shared in conversation with 68 individuals from around the country who joined the call.

SETTING THE CONTEXT While there is no clear consensus around the definition of polyvictimization, the term describes the collective experiences of multiple types of violence, usually in multiple settings, and often at the hands of multiple perpetrators. According to the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence, out of all the children surveyed, 38.7% have recorded at least one incident of victimization, either direct or indirect. Of those children, 10.9% reported 5 or more direct exposures to different types of violence and 1.4% reported 10 or more direct victimizations.

Read the full report: https://cantasd.acf.hhs.gov/wp-content/uploads/FTF-polyvictimization.pdf

Blog post written by Jerry MIlner, Acting Commissioner of the Children's Bureau, on what he has learned from listening to families involved with the child welfare system.

Rethinking Foster Care <https://rethinkingfostercare.blogspot.com/>

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Hope

<http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RethinkingFosterCare/~3/841sRlcZFAc/hope.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email>

 

Posted: 20 Aug 2019 09:37 AM PDT

 

*Hope*

 

A few days ago, I walked into a room full of young adults who had spent time in our foster care system, including some who had emancipated after many years. Entering a room full of folks who have experienced our foster care system personally is a familiar situation for me, and it’s one of the greatest privileges and joys of my job.  I meet and speak with as many young people and parents with lived experience as possible.  In fact, this group was the second group of young people I had meet with that day.

 

In looking around the room, I realized that I knew nearly all of the young people in the room*.  I mean I* *really knew them - *Kayla, Joshua, Diego, David, Leroy, Scout, Lupe, Eric-lee and so many others.  I had met these people on multiple occasions. We had been in meetings together, attended the same events, and had lots of conversation.  I had heard their stories, been in photos together, and befriended many on social media (the only reason I stay on social media).  I even mentor one of these young people as best I can although, truth be told, he should be mentoring me.

 

I was struck by the reality that in two short years, these incredible young people have become an indispensable part of my world.  Their experiences and wisdom are now integrated into my experience and wisdom - an unexpected gift.

 

As always, the staff of the organization or agency holding the meetings I attend thanked me profusely for making the time to attend, to listen to the young people, to make them a priority in my busy schedule, and so on.

 

When this happens I always smile politely and say what a pleasure it is, but the response swirling in my head is, *really*?  You’re *really *thanking me for doing this?

 

If listening to and making an effort to understand the voices of those we purport to serve are not our priorities, what should our priorities be?

 

If we do not make time to meet with them and give them the respect of a system that has alternately aided and failed them, what should we make time for?

 

If we do not use the wisdom and words that people with lived experience share with us to guide our decisions and polices, then what should guide them?

 

In early August, the Children’s Bureau issued Information Memorandum 19-03 that calls on the field to solicit and use the voices of parents and youth who have experienced the child welfare system first-hand.  We provided specific recommendations on how it can be done and why we believe it is foundational to our work.

 

It will not happen unless we consciously cede space for it to happen and commit every day to ensure their voices are sought out and heard.

 

It may not always be easy or comfortable to give up our thinking that *we know best* and to share decision-making with those whose lives are so deeply affected by our work.

 

It may not comport with our crisis-driven work days to step back and listen.

 

But the value that their voices bring to our programs and services and, ultimately on the outcomes they experience, outweighs the effort and discomfort.

 

A couple of days after that meeting, I walked into another room - this time in Nashville, Tennessee. I was there for another meeting to co-present with a parent with lived experience (who I also feel I know quite well) and a young woman with lived foster care experience (who I look forward to becoming better acquainted with).  My colleague, David Kelly, moderated the panel.  Midway through the session, he asked the three of us a very simple question - *what gives you hope for the future of our child welfare system?*

 

My response was simple.

 

The advocacy and strength of the young adults I met with a few days ago give me hope.

 

Shrounda and Christina, the two remarkable women seated to my left, give me hope.

 

Sharing the stage with *them*rather than other bureaucrats like myself gives me hope.

 

Knowing that their resilience and tenacity were stronger than the difficulties they faced gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they and others like them have answers to our hardest questions gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they are leaders in reshaping child welfare in our country gives me hope.

 

*Hope* *is a powerful thing*.

The GrandFacts state fact sheets for grandfamilies include state-specific data and programs as well as information about public benefits, educational assistance, legal relationship options and state laws. Visit www.grandfamilies.org to find this and all GrandFacts state fact sheets.

Access the Generations United Fact Sheet.

Published in Children's Justice Act

International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry - May 11, 2019

Among various health professionals, general dental professionals (GDPs) screen children frequently, giving them a unique opportunity to act upon suspicion of child maltreatment. The dental team has received considerable attention regarding safeguarding children.  The aims of this study were to explore whether GDPs have mutual collaboration and communication with the Child Welfare Services (CWS), and potential barriers for reporting child maltreatment.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ipd.12507

Published in Children's Justice Act

Chronicle of Social Change - April 19, 2019

"We work in a field in which those who only know it vicariously believe we are on the wrong side," said one keynote speaker, Martin Guggenheim, a professor of law at New York University. "We work closely with parents who lose the most precious thing in the world (their children} and they lose it to a regime in which the people taking that away from them celebrate their victory.

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/uncategorized/aba-parent-conference-child-welfare/34610

Published in Parents' Attorneys

CNN - April 19, 2019

Researchers used publicly available data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, administered by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention every year. From the 300 emergency rooms sampled, the researchers tracked the number of children between 5 and 18 who received a diagnosis of suicidal ideation or suicide attempts each year.

https://chicagocrusader.com/number-of-children-going-to-er-with-suicidal-thoughts-attempts-doubles-study-finds/

New Foster Parents Gain Experience with Incremental Challenges

Policy & Practice - April 01, 2019

The new foster parents are ready for their first foster children. Seemingly, there should be no hesitation. But are these brand new foster parents really ready for any foster child? From a social work and legal perspective, would it be acceptable to put a young sibling group into a foster home if the parents have little or no parenting experience? There is a giant learning curve from licensed foster parent to successful foster parent and it is the obligation of the licensor and case managers to ensure that new foster parents are not overloaded beyond their capabilities.

http://yeshiva.imodules.com/s/1739/images/gid10/editor_documents/new_foster_parents_gain_experience_with_incremental_challenges.pdf?sessionid=c0111e53-2cd9-4e52-952f-371237a9b6c1&cc=1

 

Youth Today - April 22, 2019

Youth homelessness is a pervasive problem throughout the United States, and its rate has steadily risen over the years. According to the Center for American Progress, youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) are disproportionately affected by homelessness compared to their percentage in the overall population.

https://youthtoday.org/2019/04/homeless-lgbt-youth-how-we-can-fight-their-invisibility-including-youth-of-color/

FRIENDS Resource of the Month: April Edition

Meaningful Parent Leadership: Building Effective Parent/Practitioner Collaboration

Newly Revised Parent Leadership Guidebook is Available

Parent-Practitioner collaboration has many benefits for families and practitioners. For families, the benefits include opportunities to give input on the programs and services they receive, increasing their sense of personal achievement, and providing a model of leadership for their family and other families. For practitioners, the benefits are also significant. Parent-Practitioner collaboration can improve relationships between families and providers, as well as improve efforts to recruit and retain program participants.

Meaningful Parent Leadership: Building Effective Parent/Practitioner Collaboration is designed to provide guidance to Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (CBCAP) State Lead Agencies (SLA), and parents as well as other child abuse prevention, family support, and child welfare programs and organizations.

The guidebook helps participants to explore personal beliefs and practices around sharing leadership with parents and will help both parents and practitioners move toward more authentic partnerships.

Visit the FRIENDS website to download the guidebook here.

 

FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention - A service of the Children's Bureau

Published in Children's Justice Act
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