Click the attachment to read the Executive Order issued on June 24, 2020 concerning the Child Welfare System.

Published in Home Page


ABA Journal - August 13, 2019
Resolution 115C, declaring that the Indian Child Welfare Act is constitutional, was easily approved by the ABA House of Delegates on Tuesday. The Indian Child Welfare Act was passed in 1978 to address the fact that states remove Indian children from their parents at high rates. Because those children were not often placed with members of their own tribes, that high rate was hurting tribes' ability to pass on their cultures to the next generation.

Also: Editorial: ICWA ruling a victory for tribes: https://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-icwa-ruling-a-victory-for-tribes/article_d70b9f12-6d72-5de7-a80b-3064a3f7ea6c.html

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/the-indian-child-welfare-resolution-115C

 

We want to share this quick 5-minute overview with you about the Child Safety: A Guide for Judges and Attorneys that was co-authored by Jennifer Renne and Theresa Roe-Lund. We use this textbook and the bench cards in our Safety Decision Making courses that we host in Louisiana. We offer a one-hour webinar and a 6 hour class periodically. Click for the video link.

Thursday, 23 August 2018 12:46

Data Sharing: Courts and Child Welfare

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF) offers this technical assistance guidance to courts and child welfare agencies to assist and support the creation of automated, bi-directional (two-way) data exchanges between their respective information systems. This document summarizes the benefits of data exchanges, identifies data categories to consider in data-sharing agreements, provides tips for overcoming common challenges, and highlights examples of successfully operating state and locally administered data exchanges. The information and recommendations herein do not establish requirements or supersede existing laws or official guidance.

Link to guide.

Published in Data & Technology
Monday, 19 February 2018 11:40

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This issue brief highlights the importance of understanding the concerns and needs of children and families in rural communities, their strengths and resources, and the cultural sensitivity required of child welfare professionals as they work to achieve safety, permanency, and well-being for rural children.

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This report begins with an overview of the FY2017 federal child welfare funding. It then includes a discussion of how annual funding levels are determined for child welfare programs, and briefly discusses the effect of sequestration on that child welfare funding. The remainder, and largest part, of the report provides descriptions of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2013-FY2017) funding levels. The review indicates that for FY2017, an estimated $8.9 billion in federal support is available for child welfare purposes. The largest share of this federal child welfare funding is provided for support of children in foster care, and for ongoing assistance to children who leave foster care for new permanent families. The federal cost was estimated at $7.5 billion in FY2016 and, as of the July 2017 mid-session budget review, was expected to be $7.8 billion in FY2017. Federal funding for all other child welfare activities remained at $1.1 billion in FY2017, which was the same level provided in FY2016. Nearly all federal child welfare dollars (97%) were provided to State, tribal, or territorial child welfare agencies (via formula grants or as federal reimbursement for a part of all eligible program costs). The remaining federal child welfare dollars (3%) are provided to a variety of eligible public or private entities, primarily on a competitive basis. This money supports research, evaluation, technical assistance, and demonstration projects to expand knowledge of, and improve, child welfare practice and policy. Federally supported programs are described that are authorized under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the Victims of Child Abuse Act, and other programs. 21 tables and 136 references. 

Link to report

Title: Child Welfare: An Overview of Federal Programs and Their Current Funding. August 2017. 
Published: 2017 
Available from: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service 
http://loc.gov/crsinfo/ 
101 Independence Avenue, SE 
Washington, DC 20540-7500

Published in Children's Justice Act

Facilitating Cross-System Collaboration: A Primer on Child Welfare, Alcohol and Other Drug Services, and Courts Reviews characteristics of child welfare, substance abuse services, and courts to support cross-system coordination within State, county, and tribal jurisdictions. Considers the framework, population, legislation and funding sources, and services for each system. This report was originally published in 2012, but with the current opioid explosion, it was determined it was a good resource to list again.

http://attcppwtools.org/ResourceMaterials/FCSC_508.pdf

The ABA Center on Children and the Law, in collaboration with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, is pleased to announce the release of "TRAUMA: What Child Welfare Attorneys Should Know." This resource provides practical information about trauma-informed legal advocacy by attorneys representing children, parents, and child welfare agencies.

In furtherance of the American Bar Association's policy on trauma-informed legal practice, this resource can strengthen advocacy, improve attorney-client relationships, and promote appropriate screening, in-depth assessment, and evidence-based treatment. In addition, awareness of secondary traumatic stress can improve prevention, identification, and self-care among legal professionals.

The resource was developed by the NCTSN Justice Consortium Attorney Work Group, co-chaired by Christopher Branson, Ph.D., Carly Baetz, JD, Ph.D., and Eva Klain, JD (ABA Center on Children and the Law).

Published in Attorneys

This report begins with a review of federal appropriations activity in FY2015 as it relates to child welfare programs, including the effect of the automatic spending cuts, known as sequestration. The rest of the report provides a short description of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2012-FY2015) funding levels. Information is provided that indicates final FY2015 child welfare funding ($7.971 billion) was appropriated as part of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 (P.L. 113-235). It is explained that beginning with FY2013, some discretionary and mandatory funding amounts appropriated for child welfare programs have been reduced under the sequestration measures provided for in the Budget Control Act (P.L. 112-25), and that the effect of these sequestration measures varies by fiscal year and type for funding authority. It is determined that for FY2015, funding provided on a discretionary basis in P.L. 113-235 is within the established spending caps and is not expected to be affected by sequestration. The report goes on to explain that the largest amount of federal funding provided to child welfare programs is through mandatory funding authorized under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act and is statutorily exempted from sequestration; however, a few child welfare programs that receive mandatory funding may be subject to sequestration, including funding provided for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program. For nonexempt mandatory child welfare funding, it is reported the final FY2015 funding level must be reduced from the otherwise appropriated levels by 7.3%. 16 tables and 100 references.

Access the full report here.