Children and youth who become involved in the child welfare (CW) system often experience trauma as a result of maltreatment and other adversities while in the CW system, including removal from home and multiple out-of-home placements. Children and youth of color, particularly Black and
Native American children, are disproportionally represented in the CW system and are more likely to experience trauma due, in large part, to structural racism and historical trauma. LGBTQIA+ youth (lesbian, gay, bisexual, pansexual, transgender, genderqueer, queer, intersexed, agender, asexual, and the ally
community) are also at high risk for trauma while in the CW system.  Child Trends Brief Rebecca Vivrette and Jessica Dym Bartlett Child Trends CLICK HERE

 

Grandparents and other kin often step in to provide stability and security when parents cannot care for their children. Taking on this responsibility can lead to significant hardships, especially for older caregivers. GAO was asked to study the challenges faced by grandparents and other older kin when becoming
primary caregivers. United States Government Accountability Office CLICK HERE

This report is intended to provide family court officers and child welfare professionals who engage with child welfare involved (CWI) parents, introductory knowledge on the trauma-informed approach. Readers will be introduced to the importance of using the trauma-informed approach in their work with CWI parents, with a focus on the impact that language has on the way in which CWI parents are depicted and responded to in the courtroom. Definitions of key terms are provided first, followed by an overview of the trauma-informed approach and its application to working with CWI parents. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, this report has been updated to include recommendations for trauma-informed practices that best support families during a period of collective/shared trauma. Then the section titled, “What parents want you to know”, provides direct input from parents on their experiences, needs and perspectives.
Finally, a composite vignette which compares traditional language to trauma-informed language is presented.  Rise Magazine. CLICK HERE

Since March 2020, stay-at-home orders and deteriorating economic conditions have placed families under stress, while children home from school have diminished exposure to adults who might detect and report abuse and neglect. Some have expressed concern that these circumstances could heighten the risk of undetected maltreatment, and that an eventual return to school will result in a deluge of child maltreatment reports that could overwhelm child welfare systems. This work summarizes efforts to respond to these concerns and provide empirical guidance to child welfare system leaders. Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago CLICK HERE

Click the attachment to read the Executive Order issued on June 24, 2020 concerning the Child Welfare System.

Published in Home Page


ABA Journal - August 13, 2019
Resolution 115C, declaring that the Indian Child Welfare Act is constitutional, was easily approved by the ABA House of Delegates on Tuesday. The Indian Child Welfare Act was passed in 1978 to address the fact that states remove Indian children from their parents at high rates. Because those children were not often placed with members of their own tribes, that high rate was hurting tribes' ability to pass on their cultures to the next generation.

Also: Editorial: ICWA ruling a victory for tribes: https://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-icwa-ruling-a-victory-for-tribes/article_d70b9f12-6d72-5de7-a80b-3064a3f7ea6c.html

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/the-indian-child-welfare-resolution-115C

 

We want to share this quick 5-minute overview with you about the Child Safety: A Guide for Judges and Attorneys that was co-authored by Jennifer Renne and Theresa Roe-Lund. We use this textbook and the bench cards in our Safety Decision Making courses that we host in Louisiana. We offer a one-hour webinar and a 6 hour class periodically. Click for the video link.

Thursday, 23 August 2018 12:46

Data Sharing: Courts and Child Welfare

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF) offers this technical assistance guidance to courts and child welfare agencies to assist and support the creation of automated, bi-directional (two-way) data exchanges between their respective information systems. This document summarizes the benefits of data exchanges, identifies data categories to consider in data-sharing agreements, provides tips for overcoming common challenges, and highlights examples of successfully operating state and locally administered data exchanges. The information and recommendations herein do not establish requirements or supersede existing laws or official guidance.

Link to guide.

Published in Data & Technology
Monday, 19 February 2018 11:40

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This issue brief highlights the importance of understanding the concerns and needs of children and families in rural communities, their strengths and resources, and the cultural sensitivity required of child welfare professionals as they work to achieve safety, permanency, and well-being for rural children.

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This report begins with an overview of the FY2017 federal child welfare funding. It then includes a discussion of how annual funding levels are determined for child welfare programs, and briefly discusses the effect of sequestration on that child welfare funding. The remainder, and largest part, of the report provides descriptions of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2013-FY2017) funding levels. The review indicates that for FY2017, an estimated $8.9 billion in federal support is available for child welfare purposes. The largest share of this federal child welfare funding is provided for support of children in foster care, and for ongoing assistance to children who leave foster care for new permanent families. The federal cost was estimated at $7.5 billion in FY2016 and, as of the July 2017 mid-session budget review, was expected to be $7.8 billion in FY2017. Federal funding for all other child welfare activities remained at $1.1 billion in FY2017, which was the same level provided in FY2016. Nearly all federal child welfare dollars (97%) were provided to State, tribal, or territorial child welfare agencies (via formula grants or as federal reimbursement for a part of all eligible program costs). The remaining federal child welfare dollars (3%) are provided to a variety of eligible public or private entities, primarily on a competitive basis. This money supports research, evaluation, technical assistance, and demonstration projects to expand knowledge of, and improve, child welfare practice and policy. Federally supported programs are described that are authorized under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the Victims of Child Abuse Act, and other programs. 21 tables and 136 references. 

Link to report

Title: Child Welfare: An Overview of Federal Programs and Their Current Funding. August 2017. 
Published: 2017 
Available from: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service 
http://loc.gov/crsinfo/ 
101 Independence Avenue, SE 
Washington, DC 20540-7500

Published in Children's Justice Act
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