This tool was created by the Children’s Rights Litigation Committee of the American Bar Association Section of Litigation. Thank you to everyone who contributed to this document including DLA Piper LLP (US); Andrew Cohen, Dir. of Appellate Panel, Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Services, Children & Family Law Division, and Aylin Corapcioglu and Mariel Smith, Legal Interns, Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Services, Children & Family Law Division; and Krista Ellis, former legal intern, American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law 
American Bar Association. Children’s Rights Litigation Committee.
2019
https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publications/litigation_committees/childrights/child-separation-memo/parent-child-separation-trauma-memo.pdf

On February 9, 2018, President Trump signed into law the landmark bipartisan Family First Prevention Services Act, as part of Division E in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (H.R. 1892). Family First includes long-overdue historic reforms to help keep children safely with their families and avoid the traumatic experience of entering foster care, emphasizes the importance of children growing up in families and helps ensure children are placed in the least restrictive, most family-like setting appropriate to their special needs when foster care is needed. Family First builds on the original version of the bill passed in the House of Representatives in June 2016 (H.R.5456).

Please click the attachment to read the full article prepared by the Children's Defense Fund.

Published in Children's Justice Act

"Earlier this summer the Children’s Bureau convened teams of up to ten individuals from every state, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands to chart a new course for child welfare in the United States: strengthening families through primary prevention of child maltreatment and family disruption. The teams included representatives from the state child welfare agency, the legal and judicial community, and prevention partners. The main purpose of the meeting was to discuss and begin planning what child welfare system partners can do together to support primary prevention—to work upstream to address the root causes that make foster care necessary in the first place."

The full document is attached so that you can review the full article by Commissioner Jerry Milner and David Kelly.

Fall 2018 - National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

Published in Judges
Monday, 06 May 2019 12:52

Strategic Planning in Child Welfare

Strategic Planning in Child Welfare

The Capacity Building Center for States’ (the Center’s) new series, Strategic Planning in Child Welfare, presents practical information including guidance and tools to support coordinated strategic and long-term planning.

These resources can help identify opportunities for coordination between the Child and Family Services Plan/Annual Progress and Services Report (CFSP/APSR) and Child and Family Services Review/Program Improvement Plan (CFSR/PIP) processes and internal agency continuous quality improvement (CQI) work. They also provide practical guidance related to CFSP development, including the meaningful involvement of stakeholders.

Series Resources

Guidance and tools provided in the series can help agencies coordinate between Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSRs), Program Improvement Plans (PIPs), Child and Family Services Plans (CFSPs), Annual Progress and Services Reports (APSRs), and internal continuous quality improvement (CQI) work.

Related Resources

Published in Children's Justice Act

We want to share this quick 5-minute overview with you about the Child Safety: A Guide for Judges and Attorneys that was co-authored by Jennifer Renne and Theresa Roe-Lund. We use this textbook and the bench cards in our Safety Decision Making courses that we host in Louisiana. We offer a one-hour webinar and a 6 hour class periodically. Click for the video link.

Wednesday, 31 October 2018 15:03

Introduction to "The Safety Guide"

We want to share this quick 5-minute overview with you about the Child Safety: A Guide for Judges and Attorneys that was co-authored by Jennifer Renne and Theresa Roe-Lund. We use this textbook and the bench cards in our Safety Decision Making courses that we host in Louisiana. We offer a one-hour webinar and a 6 hour class periodically. Click for the video link.

Published in Home Page
Thursday, 23 August 2018 12:46

Data Sharing: Courts and Child Welfare

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families (ACF) offers this technical assistance guidance to courts and child welfare agencies to assist and support the creation of automated, bi-directional (two-way) data exchanges between their respective information systems. This document summarizes the benefits of data exchanges, identifies data categories to consider in data-sharing agreements, provides tips for overcoming common challenges, and highlights examples of successfully operating state and locally administered data exchanges. The information and recommendations herein do not establish requirements or supersede existing laws or official guidance.

Link to guide.

Published in Data & Technology
Monday, 19 February 2018 11:40

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This issue brief highlights the importance of understanding the concerns and needs of children and families in rural communities, their strengths and resources, and the cultural sensitivity required of child welfare professionals as they work to achieve safety, permanency, and well-being for rural children.

Rural Child Welfare Practice

This report begins with an overview of the FY2017 federal child welfare funding. It then includes a discussion of how annual funding levels are determined for child welfare programs, and briefly discusses the effect of sequestration on that child welfare funding. The remainder, and largest part, of the report provides descriptions of each federal child welfare program, including its purpose and recent (FY2013-FY2017) funding levels. The review indicates that for FY2017, an estimated $8.9 billion in federal support is available for child welfare purposes. The largest share of this federal child welfare funding is provided for support of children in foster care, and for ongoing assistance to children who leave foster care for new permanent families. The federal cost was estimated at $7.5 billion in FY2016 and, as of the July 2017 mid-session budget review, was expected to be $7.8 billion in FY2017. Federal funding for all other child welfare activities remained at $1.1 billion in FY2017, which was the same level provided in FY2016. Nearly all federal child welfare dollars (97%) were provided to State, tribal, or territorial child welfare agencies (via formula grants or as federal reimbursement for a part of all eligible program costs). The remaining federal child welfare dollars (3%) are provided to a variety of eligible public or private entities, primarily on a competitive basis. This money supports research, evaluation, technical assistance, and demonstration projects to expand knowledge of, and improve, child welfare practice and policy. Federally supported programs are described that are authorized under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act, Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the Victims of Child Abuse Act, and other programs. 21 tables and 136 references. 

Link to report

Title: Child Welfare: An Overview of Federal Programs and Their Current Funding. August 2017. 
Published: 2017 
Available from: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service 
http://loc.gov/crsinfo/ 
101 Independence Avenue, SE 
Washington, DC 20540-7500

Published in Children's Justice Act

Facilitating Cross-System Collaboration: A Primer on Child Welfare, Alcohol and Other Drug Services, and Courts Reviews characteristics of child welfare, substance abuse services, and courts to support cross-system coordination within State, county, and tribal jurisdictions. Considers the framework, population, legislation and funding sources, and services for each system. This report was originally published in 2012, but with the current opioid explosion, it was determined it was a good resource to list again.

http://attcppwtools.org/ResourceMaterials/FCSC_508.pdf

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