Fact Sheet: Seven components of a culturally responsive approach to serving diverse populations

 

The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families released a fact sheet that outlines a comprehensive approach for practitioners looking to create strong, culturally responsive programs for community-based organizations.

As the U.S. population grows increasingly diverse, a culturally responsive approach to developing programs that serve communities is essential. This resource guide helps to ensure that practitioners don't need to start from scratch when working to design programs that serve all members of their communities. Click for more information.

Published in Children's Justice Act
Thursday, 03 November 2016 11:36

2016 Model Indian Juvenile Code Released

Bureau of Indian Affairs Publishes Updated Model Indian Juvenile Code

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has announced the publication of its 2016 Model Indian Juvenile Code. Since 2012, OJJDP worked with BIA’s Office of Justice Services Tribal Justice Support Directorate to update the 1988 Model Indian Juvenile Code. During development of the code, OJJDP worked with the Departments of Interior and Health and Human Services to gather information through listening sessions and tribal consultations. This final update serves as a framework to help federally recognized tribes interested in creating or enhancing their own codes to focus on juvenile issues, specifically alcohol- and/or drug-related offenses in Indian Country. The 2016 model code encourages the use of alternatives to detention and confinement while focusing on community-based multi-disciplinary responses to juvenile delinquency, truancy, and child-in-need services.

Resources:

View and download the 2016 Model Indian Juvenile Code.

Visit OJJDP’s Tribal Youth Program website.

From Boys to Men: The health and education of Hispanic boys and young men

This data-rich report, from The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families, compares the health and education of Latino boys and young men to those of their black and white peers. Hispanic males face challenges, such as a lower rate of educational attainment, but they also have strengths, such as beginning life with a particularly healthy start. The Center is led by Child Trends and Abt Associates with university partners.

Read the full report. Click here.

 

Violence against girls is a painfully American tale. It is a crisis of national proportions that cuts across every divide of race, class, and ethnicity. The facts are staggering: one in four American girls will experience some form of sexual violence by the age of 18. Fifteen percent of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of 12;1 nearly half of all female rape survivors were victimized before the age of 18.2 And girls between the ages of 16 and 19 are four times more likely than the general population to be victims of rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault.

And in a perverse twist of justice, many girls who experience sexual abuse are routed into the juvenile justice system because of their victimization. Indeed, sexual abuse is one of the primary predictors of girls’ entry into the juvenile justice system.4 A particularly glaring example is when girls who are victims of sex trafficking are arrested on prostitution charges — punished as perpetrators rather than served and supported as victims and survivors.

Once inside, girls encounter a system that is often ill-equipped to identify and treat the violence and trauma that lie at the root of victimized girls’ arrests. More harmful still is the significant risk that the punitive environ- ment will re-trigger girls’ trauma and even subject them to new incidents of sexual victimization, which can exponentially compound the profound harms inflicted by the original abuse.

This is the girls’ sexual abuse to prison pipeline.

This report exposes the ways in which we criminalize girls — especially girls of color — who have been sexually and physically abused, and it offers policy recommendations to dismantle the abuse to prison pipeline. It illustrates the pipeline with examples, including the detention of girls who are victims of sex trafficking, girls who run away or become truant because of abuse they experience, and girls who cross into juvenile justice from the child welfare system. By illuminating both the problem and potential solutions, we hope to make the first step toward ending the cycle of victimization-to-imprisonment for marginalized girls.

READ THE FULL REPORT/DOWNLOAD PDF.

Report prepared by:

Human Rights Project for Girls
Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality
Ms. Foundation for Women
 
November 2015