Appropriate Use of Psychiatric Medication for Youth in Foster Care (Includes audio)

Medical Health News - October 25, 2018

Foster youth are more likely than their non-foster peers to be prescribed psychiatric medications, Determining whether a medication regimen is appropriate is an important yet challenging task. While much attention has appropriately been devoted to high prescribing rates, foster youth are also at risk for unidentified and untreated behavioral health concerns.

http://www.medicalhealthnews.net/appropriate-use-of-bpsychiatricb-medication-for-youth-in-foster-care

Published in Children's Justice Act

A new study reveals what many people working in the foster care system have known for years - older children are falling behind their peers who have not experienced foster care. The Annie E. Casey Foundation collected data across all 50 states and found older children who've been in foster care are on track to face higher levels of joblessness and homelessness as adults. "Older" is defined as 14 and up. And, in Arizona's foster care system, that includes one in five kids.

Study: Fostering Youth Transitions: https://www.aecf.org/resources/fostering-youth-transitions/#summary

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

Addressing Trauma May Be the Key to Helping Foster Youth Succeed in the Workplace

Chronicle of Social Change - October 05, 2018

Internships can often serve as an important leg up for young people trying to gain work experience and build relationships with employers. But few foster youth participate in such opportunities. A recent study of California foster youth at age 21 found that only 30 percent had completed an internship, apprenticeship or other on-the-job training in the past year.

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/child-trauma-2/addressing-trauma-may-be-the-key-to-helping-foster-youth-succeed-in-the-workplace/32331

Published in Children's Justice Act

The Opioid Crisis and its Impact on Children

Legal Executive Institute - August 23, 2018

Although the impact on adults is tragic, an increasing number of children are also suffering, especially as opioid addiction reaches crisis levels. From birth on, these children are living with the consequences of their parents' addiction.

http://www.legalexecutiveinstitute.com/opioid-crisis-impact-on-children/

Published in Children's Justice Act

Medicaid Covers Foster Kids, But Daunting Health Needs Still Slip Through The Cracks

Kaiser Health News - August 24, 2018

Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor, picks up the tab for nearly all children in foster care and often continues to cover them if they are adopted, regardless of their parents' income. And as a result of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, foster children who have Medicaid at 18 can retain the coverage until they turn 26. Yet, Croom and other foster parents say that even with the coverage they struggle to meet the extraordinary health needs of their children. Part of the trouble is too few doctors accept Medicaid, most notably mental health specialists.

https://khn.org/news/medicaid-covers-foster-kids-but-daunting-health-needs-still-slip-through-the-cracks/

Published in Children's Justice Act

On February 9, 2018, President Donald Trump signed into law the most significant reform to foster care since the federal government got into that business.

This fundamental re-ordering of the government’s role in child welfare extends far beyond the 437,000 children living in foster care today. A 2017 study found that one in three U.S. children will be investigated as victims of child maltreatment by the time they turn 18. That means millions of American children will have the experience of a child abuse investigator coming into their home, questioning whether or not their parents are fit to care for them. This is no niche concern.

Despite the sweeping implications, the debate since the Family First Prevention Services Act was passed has largely been confined to the narrow world of child welfare policy. But, the development portends something much larger: a historic moment in American governance. At a time of ballooning federal deficits and Congressional leaders’ calls for reining in costly “entitlement” programs like Medicaid and Social Security, Family First quietly but significantly expanded the scope of the federal child welfare entitlement, which currently supports only foster care placements and adoptions.

Read the full article: 

https://chronicleofsocialchange.org/analysis/foster-care-and-americas-compact-vulnerable-people/31809

 

Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education is pleased to release the latest edition of the Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.

This publication provides a review of data and research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other key stakeholders. These four sections are:

1) A brief data at a glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care;

2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting;

3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care, with accompanying citations; and

4) An overview of some promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care. 

This national factsheet reflects a shift in policy and practice around the country over the past decade. The first edition, released in 2006, included a limited, but consistent, group of research studies, all depicting the poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. The 2006 national factsheet raised awareness about the critical importance of prioritizing education for students in foster care. For more than a decade, through the leadership of the National Working Group on Foster Care and Education (National Working Group), with support from various foundations including Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Stuart Foundation, several revised editions of this factsheet have been released, including this 2018 version.

We now have a growing body of research that reflects the educational needs of this group of students, most of which still indicates that students in foster care face significant educational challenges. Fortunately, we also have a growing number of federal and state laws that provide rights and protections for students in foster care, and many promising programs and interventions designed to address a wide range of factors influencing the disparities in education outcomes. With cross-system collaboration and the implementation of improved federal and state policies, we are positioned to build on what is being learned, bring about change, and promote success for all children and youth in foster care. We are grateful to the National Work Group members who have provided information to make this resource a valuable compilation of data, research, and promising interventions. This publication was compiled by the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a project of the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, in partnership with the Education Law Center and Juvenile Law Center.

We encourage you to share this resource with your networks.

Sneha Barve

Staff Attorney, Center on Children and the Law American Bar Association

1050 Connecticut Ave.

Suite 400

Washington, DC 20036

 

T:  202.442.3344

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Friends of Children launching program to help young adults out of foster care (Includes video)

WWLP - March 22, 2018

The nationwide program called FOCUS pairs those who have aged out of foster care with adults who provide resources for young men and women entering adulthood.

http://wwlp.com/2018/03/22/friends-of-children-launching-program-to-help-young-adults-out-of-foster-care/

Published in Children's Justice Act
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