Author(s): Belian, Marla.
Published: 2018
Available from: National Healthy Marriage Resource Center
http://www.healthymarriageinfo.org/index.aspxexternal link(opens in new window)
1950 W. Littleton Blvd #306
Littleton, CO 80120
Document available online at: NationalResourceCenterforHealthyMarriageandFamilies16521
Printable version (PDF): https://healthymarriageandfamilies.org/sites/default/files/Resource%20Files/FosterYouthTipSheet_508_Final.pdf external link(opens in new window)
Abstract: This federally funded tip sheet explains there are approximately 430,000 children and youth in foster care on any given day, the negative impact of adverse experiences in the early years, and how nurturing caregivers can help increase a child's resilience by building in them strengths at the relational level. It then provides caregivers with ways to be the support system that a child in foster care needs to help them develop the critical relationships skills necessary for future stability, healthy decision making, and overall growth. Tips include: provide youth with a safe space and let your relationship develop naturally; model health relationship behaviors; remember that it’s the simple things that count and that kids notice; don’t give up in trying to form an attachment or bond with the foster child; and support the development of lifelong connections. 11 references. 

Wednesday, 02 October 2019 10:04

Adopting as a Single Parent

Published: 2019
Document available online at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/single-parent/
Printable version (PDF): https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/single_parent.pdf
Abstract: Explores issues that are specifically relevant to single people considering adoption. The factsheet includes information about available adoption opportunities, including domestic adoption, intercountry adoption, and adopting from foster care. It also discusses the importance of having a support system and dispels the myth that being single impedes the adoption process. 

Blog post written by Jerry MIlner, Acting Commissioner of the Children's Bureau, on what he has learned from listening to families involved with the child welfare system.

Rethinking Foster Care <https://rethinkingfostercare.blogspot.com/>

------------------------------

Hope

<http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RethinkingFosterCare/~3/841sRlcZFAc/hope.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email>

 

Posted: 20 Aug 2019 09:37 AM PDT

 

*Hope*

 

A few days ago, I walked into a room full of young adults who had spent time in our foster care system, including some who had emancipated after many years. Entering a room full of folks who have experienced our foster care system personally is a familiar situation for me, and it’s one of the greatest privileges and joys of my job.  I meet and speak with as many young people and parents with lived experience as possible.  In fact, this group was the second group of young people I had meet with that day.

 

In looking around the room, I realized that I knew nearly all of the young people in the room*.  I mean I* *really knew them - *Kayla, Joshua, Diego, David, Leroy, Scout, Lupe, Eric-lee and so many others.  I had met these people on multiple occasions. We had been in meetings together, attended the same events, and had lots of conversation.  I had heard their stories, been in photos together, and befriended many on social media (the only reason I stay on social media).  I even mentor one of these young people as best I can although, truth be told, he should be mentoring me.

 

I was struck by the reality that in two short years, these incredible young people have become an indispensable part of my world.  Their experiences and wisdom are now integrated into my experience and wisdom - an unexpected gift.

 

As always, the staff of the organization or agency holding the meetings I attend thanked me profusely for making the time to attend, to listen to the young people, to make them a priority in my busy schedule, and so on.

 

When this happens I always smile politely and say what a pleasure it is, but the response swirling in my head is, *really*?  You’re *really *thanking me for doing this?

 

If listening to and making an effort to understand the voices of those we purport to serve are not our priorities, what should our priorities be?

 

If we do not make time to meet with them and give them the respect of a system that has alternately aided and failed them, what should we make time for?

 

If we do not use the wisdom and words that people with lived experience share with us to guide our decisions and polices, then what should guide them?

 

In early August, the Children’s Bureau issued Information Memorandum 19-03 that calls on the field to solicit and use the voices of parents and youth who have experienced the child welfare system first-hand.  We provided specific recommendations on how it can be done and why we believe it is foundational to our work.

 

It will not happen unless we consciously cede space for it to happen and commit every day to ensure their voices are sought out and heard.

 

It may not always be easy or comfortable to give up our thinking that *we know best* and to share decision-making with those whose lives are so deeply affected by our work.

 

It may not comport with our crisis-driven work days to step back and listen.

 

But the value that their voices bring to our programs and services and, ultimately on the outcomes they experience, outweighs the effort and discomfort.

 

A couple of days after that meeting, I walked into another room - this time in Nashville, Tennessee. I was there for another meeting to co-present with a parent with lived experience (who I also feel I know quite well) and a young woman with lived foster care experience (who I look forward to becoming better acquainted with).  My colleague, David Kelly, moderated the panel.  Midway through the session, he asked the three of us a very simple question - *what gives you hope for the future of our child welfare system?*

 

My response was simple.

 

The advocacy and strength of the young adults I met with a few days ago give me hope.

 

Shrounda and Christina, the two remarkable women seated to my left, give me hope.

 

Sharing the stage with *them*rather than other bureaucrats like myself gives me hope.

 

Knowing that their resilience and tenacity were stronger than the difficulties they faced gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they and others like them have answers to our hardest questions gives me hope.

 

Knowing that they are leaders in reshaping child welfare in our country gives me hope.

 

*Hope* *is a powerful thing*.

America's Christian Credit Union - August 13, 2019
America's Christian Credit Union (ACCU), a faith-based financial institution headquartered in Glendora, CA, recently conducted a financial literacy workshop serving foster youth at Pasadena City College (PCC). In keeping with one of its key corporate priorities of building stronger futures, ACCU provided the students with basic financial knowledge. https://www.cuinsight.com/press-release/accu-partners-with-community-college-to-teach-financial-literacy-serving-foster-youth

Held at PCC’s Foothill campus, the sessions covered topics such as balancing a checkbook, building a good credit score, setting financial goals, and budgeting. A dozen ACCU staff members volunteered their time on three consecutive Saturdays—July 13, 20, and 27.
Workshop presenter Rachel, an Accounting staff at ACCU, had personal reasons for her involvement. Having made financial mistakes in the past, Rachel felt she had something to contribute based on her own experience. She was also inspired by her mother, who had grown up in foster care. “When I told my mom what we were doing, she was really excited about it,” recalls Rachel. “She said that as a foster kid you don’t feel like you belong to yourself, and it’s great that ACCU can come alongside and help these young people.”

This report turns the lens on young people who age out of foster care and explores four areas — education, early parenthood, homelessness and incarceration — where they fare worse than their general population peers. Readers will learn the economic cost of this shortfall and see how targeted interventions can help these youth while also erasing billions of dollars in unnecessary costs.

Read this new report from Annie E. Casey Foundation - click here.

Released January 2019

Advocate - February 16, 2019

They first came to the Legislature as part of a fledgling internship program through the nonprofit Louisiana Institute for Children in Families. But they are expected to be key players this session, as the Legislature debates extending foster care beyond age 18.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/article_cd6e7cb4-3185-11e9-84d3-073002927bd6.html

Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education is pleased to release the latest edition of the Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.

This publication provides a review of data and research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other key stakeholders. These four sections are:

1) A brief data at a glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care;

2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting;

3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care, with accompanying citations; and

4) An overview of some promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care. 

This national factsheet reflects a shift in policy and practice around the country over the past decade. The first edition, released in 2006, included a limited, but consistent, group of research studies, all depicting the poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. The 2006 national factsheet raised awareness about the critical importance of prioritizing education for students in foster care. For more than a decade, through the leadership of the National Working Group on Foster Care and Education (National Working Group), with support from various foundations including Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Stuart Foundation, several revised editions of this factsheet have been released, including this 2018 version.

We now have a growing body of research that reflects the educational needs of this group of students, most of which still indicates that students in foster care face significant educational challenges. Fortunately, we also have a growing number of federal and state laws that provide rights and protections for students in foster care, and many promising programs and interventions designed to address a wide range of factors influencing the disparities in education outcomes. With cross-system collaboration and the implementation of improved federal and state policies, we are positioned to build on what is being learned, bring about change, and promote success for all children and youth in foster care. We are grateful to the National Work Group members who have provided information to make this resource a valuable compilation of data, research, and promising interventions. This publication was compiled by the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a project of the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, in partnership with the Education Law Center and Juvenile Law Center.

We encourage you to share this resource with your networks.

Sneha Barve

Staff Attorney, Center on Children and the Law American Bar Association

1050 Connecticut Ave.

Suite 400

Washington, DC 20036

 

T:  202.442.3344

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Friends of Children launching program to help young adults out of foster care (Includes video)

WWLP - March 22, 2018

The nationwide program called FOCUS pairs those who have aged out of foster care with adults who provide resources for young men and women entering adulthood.

http://wwlp.com/2018/03/22/friends-of-children-launching-program-to-help-young-adults-out-of-foster-care/

Published in Children's Justice Act
Page 1 of 4