Wednesday, 09 September 2020 13:04

Educational Supports for Youth in Foster Care

This factsheet discusses laws that require child welfare agencies to make reasonable efforts to provide services that will help families remedy the conditions that brought the child and family into the child welfare system. The issues examined include what constitutes reasonable efforts, when reasonable efforts are required to be made, and the circumstances under which reasonable efforts to reunify the family are not required. Summaries of laws for all States and U.S. territories are included. Child Welfare Information Gateway CLICK HERE

Monday, 17 August 2020 10:08

COVID-19 Impact Briefs

COVID-19 Impact Briefs

The National Resource Center for Reaching Victims conducted a series of listening sessions to unearth the impact the COVID-19 health crisis is having on underserved victims of crime and better resource the crime victim services field to respond to those needs. From these listening sessions, the National Resource Center and our Partners created a series of COVID-19 Survivor Impact Briefs that summarize the issues and strategies that emerged. The National Resource Center for Reaching Victims CLICK HERE

Published in Resources

This article discusses strategies for parents to use when their foster or adoptive child comes out as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ). Recommendations include: expect to deal with LGBTQ issues, accept the declaration as truth, show acceptance, understand when youth come out, the life of an adoptive or foster parent will get better, acknowledge it is a life or death issue, and get educated. Fostering Families Today  CLICK HERE

Published in LGBTQ Youth

America's Christian Credit Union - August 13, 2019
America's Christian Credit Union (ACCU), a faith-based financial institution headquartered in Glendora, CA, recently conducted a financial literacy workshop serving foster youth at Pasadena City College (PCC). In keeping with one of its key corporate priorities of building stronger futures, ACCU provided the students with basic financial knowledge. https://www.cuinsight.com/press-release/accu-partners-with-community-college-to-teach-financial-literacy-serving-foster-youth

Held at PCC’s Foothill campus, the sessions covered topics such as balancing a checkbook, building a good credit score, setting financial goals, and budgeting. A dozen ACCU staff members volunteered their time on three consecutive Saturdays—July 13, 20, and 27.
Workshop presenter Rachel, an Accounting staff at ACCU, had personal reasons for her involvement. Having made financial mistakes in the past, Rachel felt she had something to contribute based on her own experience. She was also inspired by her mother, who had grown up in foster care. “When I told my mom what we were doing, she was really excited about it,” recalls Rachel. “She said that as a foster kid you don’t feel like you belong to yourself, and it’s great that ACCU can come alongside and help these young people.”

Advocate - February 16, 2019

They first came to the Legislature as part of a fledgling internship program through the nonprofit Louisiana Institute for Children in Families. But they are expected to be key players this session, as the Legislature debates extending foster care beyond age 18.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/article_cd6e7cb4-3185-11e9-84d3-073002927bd6.html

Published in Children's Justice Act

This guide is intended to equip State, Tribal, and Territorial child welfare managers and administrators — as well as family support organizations — with current information about effective strategies for developing data-driven family support servicesi and research findings to help them make the case for implementing and sustaining these services. Download the Support Matters guidebook.

This guide was created by AdoptUSKids.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 12:02

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Moving Out But Struggling to Move On

Flatland - July 16, 2018

When it comes to education and work, many foster kids are already at a disadvantage when they enter the system, often coming from families beset by generational poverty. Unfortunately, their circumstances are not much improved once they "age out" of foster care, according to findings in a national survey by the organization Child Trends.

Survey: Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/SYPTFC-Findings-from-a-National-Survey-11.29.17.pdf

Also: The Fire Within Fuels Path From Foster Care to University: http://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/fire-fuels-path-foster-care-university/

Also: Information Gateway resource: Transition to Adulthood and Independent Living: https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/outofhome/independent/

https://www.flatlandkc.org/news-issues/foster-children-kansas-city-struggle-education-work/

Published in Youth

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education is pleased to release the latest edition of the Fostering Success in Education: National Factsheet on the Educational Outcomes of Children in Foster Care.

This publication provides a review of data and research, laws, and promising programs impacting the educational success of children in foster care. It consists of four sections that can individually or collectively inform advocates, policymakers, agency leaders, and other key stakeholders. These four sections are:

1) A brief data at a glance summary about the educational outcomes of students in foster care;

2) A summary of select federal policies that support educational stability and success and increased data collection and reporting;

3) A comprehensive review of the studies and research related to the education of students in foster care, with accompanying citations; and

4) An overview of some promising data-supported programs or interventions around the country designed to benefit students in foster care. 

This national factsheet reflects a shift in policy and practice around the country over the past decade. The first edition, released in 2006, included a limited, but consistent, group of research studies, all depicting the poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. The 2006 national factsheet raised awareness about the critical importance of prioritizing education for students in foster care. For more than a decade, through the leadership of the National Working Group on Foster Care and Education (National Working Group), with support from various foundations including Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Stuart Foundation, several revised editions of this factsheet have been released, including this 2018 version.

We now have a growing body of research that reflects the educational needs of this group of students, most of which still indicates that students in foster care face significant educational challenges. Fortunately, we also have a growing number of federal and state laws that provide rights and protections for students in foster care, and many promising programs and interventions designed to address a wide range of factors influencing the disparities in education outcomes. With cross-system collaboration and the implementation of improved federal and state policies, we are positioned to build on what is being learned, bring about change, and promote success for all children and youth in foster care. We are grateful to the National Work Group members who have provided information to make this resource a valuable compilation of data, research, and promising interventions. This publication was compiled by the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education, a project of the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, in partnership with the Education Law Center and Juvenile Law Center.

We encourage you to share this resource with your networks.

Sneha Barve

Staff Attorney, Center on Children and the Law American Bar Association

1050 Connecticut Ave.

Suite 400

Washington, DC 20036

 

T:  202.442.3344

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Friends of Children launching program to help young adults out of foster care (Includes video)

WWLP - March 22, 2018

The nationwide program called FOCUS pairs those who have aged out of foster care with adults who provide resources for young men and women entering adulthood.

http://wwlp.com/2018/03/22/friends-of-children-launching-program-to-help-young-adults-out-of-foster-care/

Published in Children's Justice Act

Promoting Permanency for Teens: A 50 State Review of Law and Policy.
Johnson, Anna. Speiglman, Richard. Mauldon, Jane. Grimm, Bill. Perry, Miranda.
National Center for Youth Law.
2018
https://youthlaw.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Promoting-Permanency-for-Teens.pdf

Promoting Permanency for Teens: A 50 State Review of Law and Policy explores the diversity of state policies and practices for teens in foster care in two potentially competing areas: teens’ need for a permanent connection to a family (either their birth family, or an adoptive or guardian family), and teens’ developmental and practical needs in transitioning to legal adulthood, independence, and self-sufficiency. In the context of these concurrent goals, policies, practices, and programs can serve as incentives or disincentives to pursuing permanency for teens.

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