The growing awareness of human trafficking in the United States and abroad requires government and human services agencies to reevaluate old policies and develop new ones for identifying and serving victims. Due to their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability, children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers who are actively seeking children1 to exploit. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare agencies be at the forefront of the response to and prevention of human trafficking. Additionally, recent Federal legislation established new requirements for child welfare agencies related to identifying and serving minor victims of human trafficking.

1 For the purposes of this report, the term “children” includes youth. The term “youth” is used when source materials specifically reference that population.

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Child welfare caseworkers can be an invaluable resource in helping communities respond to the human trafficking of children. Children involved with child welfare are at risk for being targeted by traffickers because of their potentially unstable living situations, physical distance from friends and family, traumatic experiences, and emotional vulnerability. Therefore, it is imperative that child welfare caseworkers be at the forefront of efforts to identify, respond to, and prevent human trafficking. This bulletin explores how caseworkers can identify and support children who have been victimized as well as children that are at greater risk for future victimization. It provides background information about the issue, strategies caseworkers can use to identify and support victims and potential victims, and tools and resources that can assist caseworkers.

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Missing Children, State Care, and Child Sex Trafficking: Engaging the Judiciary in Building a Collaborative Response

This technical assistance brief is a publication of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®. Special thanks to Melissa Snow, M.A., Child Sex Trafficking Program Specialist, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, and Mimari Hall, M.A., for developing this technical assistance brief. Additional thanks to Maureen Sheeran, Chief Program Officer, and Sarah Smith, J.D., Senior Staff Attorney of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges for their thorough review as well as Staca Shehan, Director, Case Analysis Division, and Yiota Souras, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Reproduction of this publication for noncommercial education and information purposes is encouraged. Reproduction of any part of this publication must include the copyright notice and attribution:
Missing Children, State Care, and Child Sex Trafficking: Engaging the Judiciary in Building a Collaborative Response. Technical assistance brief. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Alexandria, Virginia, and National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Reno, Nevada, 2015. Copyright © 2015 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. All rights reserved.

Published in Judges
Monday, 04 May 2015 19:00

OJJDP's Model Programs Guide (MPG)

This online resource of evidence-based juvenile justice and youth prevention, intervention, and reentry programs, has added three new literature reviews. MPG literature reviews provide practitioners and policymakers with relevant research and evaluations on more than 40 juvenile justice topics and programs. These three literature reviews address:

In addition to literature reviews, MPG offers program profiles, information on program implementation, and resource links.

Published in Best Practices

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